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Here's the code, I tried letting type inference figure out the function's type. While the code compiles, it fails at runtime.

Ambiguous type variables `b0', `m0' in the constraint:
  (PersistBackend b0 m0) arising from a use of `isFree'
Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
In the expression: isFree testDay
In an equation for `it': it = isFree testDay

:t isFree

isFree :: PersistBackend b m => C.Day -> b m Bool

>isFree day = do
   match <- selectList [TestStartDate ==. day,
                        TestStatus !=. Passed,
                        TestStatus !=. Failed] []
   if (L.null match) then (liftIO $ return True) else (liftIO $ return False)
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3 Answers

ghci is telling you that it doesn't know which type expressions to choose for b and m. All you have to do is tell it,

isFree testDay :: Foo Bar Bool

In real programmes, these type variables are usually determined at the use site, so you rarely have to specify an expression's type there. At the ghci prompt, the context is missing, so you often have to do it.

Unrelated, the last line of isFree would better be return $ L.null match

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liftIO (return x) is probably just return x. Not sure if there are any "laws" for MonadIO or MonadTrans instances, but if there were, that would surely be one. =) –  Daniel Wagner Nov 3 '11 at 1:45
    
Not sure what Foo and Bar need to be. –  Michael Litchard Nov 3 '11 at 1:48
    
D'oh. Of course, thanks. To quote my favourite signature: "If I haven't seen further, it is by standing in the footprints of giants." –  Daniel Fischer Nov 3 '11 at 1:50
1  
@MichaelLitchard: whatever things you want, as long as there's an instance PersistBackend Foo Bar. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 3 '11 at 1:52
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"While the code compiles, it fails at runtime." is very unlikely to be an error in supplying a type to this function.

What does "fail" mean?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is embarrassing. One one hand, this problem did get me to delve into the depths of Yesod monads. One the other hand, this question was already answered for me. When you run a database action, pass the result to runDB like so.

>isFree day = do
   match <- runDB $ selectList [TestStartDate ==. day,
                                TestStatus !=. Passed,
                                TestStatus !=. Failed] []
   if (L.null match) then (liftIO $ return True) else (liftIO $ return False)
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