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Possible Duplicate:
How to get current python interpreter path from inside a Python script?

The title pretty much says it. I'd like to know which python executable is being used from inside python. Something like

Python 2.7.2 (default, Nov  1 2011, 03:31:17)
[GCC 4.4.5] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> print <insert the code I'm after here>
/usr/local/bin/python2.7
>>>
Python 2.6.6 (r266:84292, Dec 27 2010, 00:02:40)
[GCC 4.4.5] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> print <insert the code I'm after here>
/usr/bin/python2.6
>>>

You get the picture

Thanks

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Tadeck, Johnsyweb, Eli Bendersky, Graviton Nov 4 '11 at 8:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do this:

>>> import sys
>>> print sys.executable
/usr/bin/python

as described here: How to get the python.exe location programmatically?

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I needed, thanks – Hubro Nov 3 '11 at 4:04

Why not just use the bash where command?

Anyways, here is what you're looking for:

import sys
sys.executable
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe he needs the name of the executable of that particular instance, and it can be any program linked with Python's library. – lvella Nov 3 '11 at 3:56
    
That's correct! – Hubro Nov 3 '11 at 4:03
    
Great! - Wait, why wasn't I up voted or ticket? o.O – A T Nov 3 '11 at 4:37
    
its which python command not where !!! – shahjapan Nov 3 '11 at 5:39
    
where on windows – A T Nov 3 '11 at 5:48

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