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Happy November to all,

Well I tried Xcode Build and analyze on my project, and it showed some unusual leaks, which I couldn't quite accept with my knowledge of Objective C.

So I decided to put up a test project and ask here..

MemoryTestController.h

@interface MemoryTestController : UIViewController{
  UIImageView *tstImageView;
}
@property(nonatomic,retain) UIImageView *tstImageView;
@end

MemoryTestController.m

@implementation MemoryTestController
@synthesize tstImageView;

- (void)viewDidLoad{
  [super viewDidLoad];

  self.tstImageView  = [[UIImageView alloc] //<==This object is leaking
                           initWithFrame:<SomeFrame>]; 
  self.tstImageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"SomeImage.png"];
  [self.view addSubview:tstImageView];
  [tstImageView release];
}

-(void)dealloc{
  [tstImageView release];
  [super dealloc];
}
@end

When I try Build and analyze, clang static analyzer say

Potential leak of an object at line xx

And the culprit line is

self.tstImageView  = [[UIImageView alloc]initWithFrame:<SomeFrame>];

I think I am releasing once for every time I am allocing/retaining. Am I missing something, or Static analyzer has some bugs?

EDIT : Is there any leak there?

Well I run the above project using Leak tool in instrument..It didn't show any leak even though I tried many times..Whom should I believe? Static analyzer or Leak instrument?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

your problem is how you release it:

- (void)viewDidLoad{
  [super viewDidLoad];

  self.tstImageView  = [[UIImageView alloc] //<==This object is leaking
                           initWithFrame:<SomeFrame>]; 
  self.tstImageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"SomeImage.png"];
  [self.view addSubview:tstImageView];
  [tstImageView release]; // << here
}

you should do it this way:

- (void)viewDidLoad{
  [super viewDidLoad];

  UIImageView * imageView  = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:<SomeFrame>]; 
  imageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"SomeImage.png"];
  self.tstImageView  = imageView;
  [imageView release];
  [self.view addSubview:self.tstImageView];
}

The checker is correct because it cannot assume that the variable is identical to the one you set. Therefore, the form you use in the OP could introduce a reference count imbalance because the ivar's value may not be what you assigned to it by the time you message release upon the ivar.

These cases are not likely for a UIImageView, and quite unlikely in the context of your program, but these examples should give you an idea as to why the checker assumes that object->ivar associations shall not be trusted:

Between creation of the image view and the message to release it via the ivar, you have:

  self.tstImageView  = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:<SomeFrame>]; 
  self.tstImageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"SomeImage.png"];
  [self.view addSubview:tstImageView];

1) assignment of the image view via the setter 2) access of the image view via the getter 3) direct access of the ivar, when adding to self.view

  • the setter may have taken a copied or used a cached value. UIImageView is a bad example, but the checker does not know how types are generally passed around - even if it did, it would (at times) make unsafe assumptions.

the simplest example would be:

- (void)setName:(NSString *)inName {
  NSString * prev = name;
  if (inName == prev) return;
  if (0 == [inName count]) name = @"";
  else name = [inName copy];
  [prev release];
}
  • the value held by the ivar could change in the meantime. not likely an issue in this case, but let's say that adding the image view as the subview could end up calling back and altering self in the process/effect of adding the subview, and replacing or removing the image view you passed. In that case, the variable view you passed would leak and the view it replaced it with would have a negative imbalance.

Neither of those are likely to happen in your example, but it does happen in real world programs, and the checker is correctly evaluating based on locality, not property (the checker can't assume much of what happens inside a method call). It also encourages one good idiomatic style in this case.

EDIT : Is there any leak there?

Well I run the above project using Leak tool in instrument..It didn't shown any leak even though I tried it many times..Whom should I believe? Static analyzer or Leak instrument?

The static analyzer says there is a potential leak because it is unable to guarantee the reference/allocation it follows is correctly retained/released. You can guarantee that reference counting is correct and please the static analyzer by changing you program to look like I wrote it in my example.

The way you have written it has made it impossible for the analyzer to follow the reference.

If you have no leaks and no zombies, then there is not a leak. But the solution is easy to fix - and programs have a way of changing during development. It's much easier to use the form I posted so it is easier for the toolset and for you to verify the program is correct. The static analyzer is not always correct, but you should adjust your programs to please it because static analysis is very useful. The program I posted is also easier for a human to understand and confirm that it is correct.

share|improve this answer
    
the checker is correct because it cannot assume that the variable is identical to the one you set. therefore, the form you use in the OP could introduce a reference count imbalance because it could change by the time you release it -------- can you explain this a bit.. – Krishnabhadra Nov 3 '11 at 6:29
    
please see my edit – Krishnabhadra Nov 3 '11 at 6:47
1  
@Krishnabhadra in response to your first comment: expanded. working on second question. – justin Nov 3 '11 at 6:52
    
@Krishnabhadra second update posted. – justin Nov 3 '11 at 7:02
    
hmm... @Justin you have been really helpful..And you are right, it is always good to follow a some coding principle which is easy for everyone to understand (even if it is human or a program like static analyzer)..I am accepting your answer.. – Krishnabhadra Nov 3 '11 at 7:04

when you declare a property with retain like this

@property(nonatomic,retain) UIImageView *tstImageView;

a setter is added that will incr the retainCount when you assign to the property. When you do as below the object you created has already a retainCount == 1

self.tstImageView  = [[UIImageView alloc] 
                           initWithFrame:<SomeFrame>];

so the tstImageView object has 2 in retainCount.

do instead

UIImageView* view = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:<SomeFrame>];
self.tstImageView  = view;
[view release];

then, although unrelated to your leak when you release it write like this instead

self.tstImageView = nil;

since the setter will then will properly set the retainCount

share|improve this answer
    
Absolute retain counts are meaningless. – bbum Nov 3 '11 at 14:27

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