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Was just running through the ruleset of Parasoft's code analysis tool.

public int testProperty // violation
{
  private get // not matching property accessibility
  { return _testValue; }
  set
  { _testValue = value; }
}

The fix to make them both match. The reason points to the properties section on this MSDN Page on the CLS. However the justification for this is not mentioned on the page.

I frequently use automatic properties of the form public int MyProp { get; private set;}

Is this a violation of the CLS ? RFC

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you look at a more recent version of that page (or even the .NET 2.0 version) it doesn't have that rule. Basically it went away between v1.1 and v2.0... at the same time when C# started allowing them to be specified differently :)

It was a silly rule, and a silly lack-of-feature in C# 1, IMO. It's obviously useful to be able to have a private setter and a public getter. It's pretty rare to have it the other way round, admittedly...

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Doh! MSDN needs a more prominent way of showing that the page is outdated. I just clicked the link provided in the description of the parasoft rule. Thanks Jon. This means I need to check every parasoft SCA rule now :( –  Gishu Nov 3 '11 at 6:37
    
The version is the first thing beneath the title :) Can you specify which version the Parasoft tool targets? –  Jon Skeet Nov 3 '11 at 6:58
    
yeah I was thinking more of a gray/disabled background color or a huge OUT-OF-DATE watermark :) Nope, there isn't a target framework setting. There are just a set of around 400 rules - I've just spent a couple of days with it, I wouldn't shell out my money for this. Half of the rules are pretty flaky. More details on my blog in case anyone's interested. –  Gishu Nov 9 '11 at 8:46

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