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In C++, in addition to my question Erasing element from Vector, how can I generalise the method for deleting an element from a vector into a function that takes the following arguments: the vector, and the element to be deleted from this vector ?

bool removeElementFromVector(vector * collection, void * element) {
    for(int i=0; i<collection->size(); i++){
        if (collection[i]==element){
            swap(collection[i], collection.back());
            collection.pop_back();
            return true;
        }
    }
}

My problem here is that I don't know how the parameter-list has to look like in order to be able for this to work with any vector<whatever*> and any object whatever!?

EDIT: Solution:

myfunctions.h

template <typename T>
bool removeElementFromVector(vector<T> & collection, T const & element) { 
    // for... 
}

myclass.h

#include "myfunctions.h"
public:
vector<Item*> items;                        
void removeItem(Item * item);          

myclass.cpp

#include "myclass.h"
void myclass::removeItem(Item * item) {
    removeElementFromVector(this->items, item);
}
share|improve this question
1  
What does the vector class look like? The std::vector would surely take something like vector->erase(element); for example. – Valmond Nov 3 '11 at 8:24
2  
@Valmond, vector::erase is O(n), OP's method is O(1) (although it messes up the order of elements). – avakar Nov 3 '11 at 8:32
    
OP doesn't care about the order ;) – Ben Nov 3 '11 at 8:57
up vote 5 down vote accepted

In C++, the type safe way to write generic code that will work on different types is not passing void*, but rather templates. In your particular case:

template <typename T>
void removeElement( std::vector<T> & collection, T const & element ) {
   collection.erase( std::remove( collection.begin(), collection.end(), element ),
                     collection.end() );
}

By using a template on the contained type T, you make it generic. Internally, the idiom for removing the elements from the vector is the erase-remove idiom, which will remove the elements that match, and compact the rest of the elements forward maintaining the relative order. I have changed the pointers for references. If your container holds pointers to a given type, and the element passed is a pointer to that type, the compiler will infer T to be type* for you, but the code above will also work for containers that do not hold pointers (a bit more generic)

If the relative order is not important, you can use the same loop that you had in your question, which will be more efficient (smaller number of copies).

share|improve this answer
    
Why should I use references instead of pointers? I tried using this as follows: vector<Item*> items; removeElement(items, item); but I get the compiler-error: undefined reference to bool removeElement<Item*>(std::vector<Item*, std::allocator<Item*> >&, Item* const&) Any help? – Ben Nov 3 '11 at 10:21
1  
@Ben: "Why should I use references instead of pointers?" References are easier to use correctly, since you don't have to deal with the possibility that they are null, and you can't accidentally change which object they refer to. – Mike Seymour Nov 3 '11 at 12:10
1  
@Ben: "Any help?" I'm guessing you put the template definition in a source file. You have to put it in a header file, and include that from any file that uses it. – Mike Seymour Nov 3 '11 at 12:11
    
@Mike: Thx, I've edited my original post to include all the details of how I am defining and calling it. What am I doing wrong? – Ben Nov 3 '11 at 14:32
1  
@Ben: you need to move the definition of the function template from "myfunctions.cpp" to "myfunctions.h". Usually, template definitions must be in header files, because they have to be available everywhere the template is used. – Mike Seymour Nov 3 '11 at 14:51

You should make the function into a template:

template <typename T>
bool removeElementFromVector(vector<T> & collection, T const & element);

Also, don't use pointers.

share|improve this answer

Make the function a template:

template <typename T>
bool removeElementFromVector(vector<T*> * collection, T* element) {
    for(int i=0; i<collection->size(); i++){
        if (collection[i]==element){
            swap(collection[i], collection.back());
            collection.pop_back();
            return true;
        }
    }
}

On another note, your code is fairly horrible with all those pointers. The standard containers are intended to store full objects, not just pointers. And likewise, the element parameter could easily be a (const) reference instead.

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