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I want to get value of checked radio input on every blur or click or focus event of radio inputs.

function getCheckedVal(){
    var checked = $('#education_number input:radio:checked')
    console.log(checked.val());
};

This is not works:

window.onload = function(){
    var radio = $('#education_number input:radio');
    for(var i=0; i<radio.length; i++){
        radio[i].addEventListener('blur', function(){getCheckedVal()});
        };
    }

And this is raise an exception:

window.onload = function(){
    var radio = $('#education_number input:radio');
    for(var i=0; i<radio.length; i++){
        radio[i].bind('blur', getCheckedVal());
        };
    }

Uncaught TypeError: Object #HTMLInputElement has no method 'bind'

How to do that?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your second example, you're calling getCheckedVal and then passing its return value into bind. You don't want those () after getCheckedVal:

window.onload = function(){
    var radio = $('#education_number input:radio');
    for(var i=0; i<radio.length; i++){
        $(radio[i]).bind('blur', getCheckedVal);
    }
}

(Note I added $(...) around radio[i], because radio[i] is a raw DOM element, not a jQuery object.)

But you can dramatically simplify that code:

window.onload = function(){
    $('#education_number input:radio').blur(getCheckedVal);
}

jQuery is very set-based. You can operate on the entire matched set of elements, rather than looping through the set yourself.

Two things to consider, though:

  • Do you really only want this information on blur? Not on change, for instance?
  • Do you really want to wait until the window#load event to hook up your event handlers? That's very late in the page load process, after all of your images and such have finished loading. Rather than using window#load, consider either putting your script at the end, just before the closing </body> tag, or using jQuery's ready function.
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Thanks for answer and right questions! –  I159 Nov 3 '11 at 9:08

bind is a jQuery method, but all you've got at this stage is an HTMLInputElement - luckily, you can pass an element to jQuery and get access to all of its functionality:

Change:

radio[i].bind('blur', getCheckedVal());

to

$(radio[i]).bind('blur', getCheckedVal);

You also need to remove the parentheses from getCheckedVal - passing getCheckedVal() to bind will cause the function to be evaluated immediately and only the return value will be bound to your event. Instead, you need to pass the function reference to bind.

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It is just:

$('#education_number input:radio').bind('blur', getCheckedVal);

Note the missing () after getCheckedVal. You have to pass a reference to the function, not call the function.

I recommend to read one of the jQuery tutorials, to learn about the basics.

One big advantage of jQuery is that it lets you easily perform actions on a collection of HTML elements. $('selector') always returns a jQuery object so you can take advantage of that. If you had a pure array of DOM elements, then yes, you'd have to iterate over them and bind the event handler individually.

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