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I have some code that can greatly be reduced in complexity by using lambdas. However unfortunately we have to use a compiler that does not fully support C++11 and we cannot easily switch. Now the question is how to keep the logic as close as possible to a lambda-expression with features not available (i.e. std::function is available, lambdas are not).

The usual solution is to define the functor somewhere else and then use it at the appropriate place:

struct functor{
   functor( type & member ) : m_member( member ) {}
   void operator()( ... ) {...}
   type & m_member;
};

void function() {
   use_functor( functor(...) );
}

I am very much used to this pattern, although I dislike it a lot. The main reason for not defining the class is usually that I the functor will be used within a STL and templates do not like structs defined inline of a function. However in my case the use_functor() function will be a normal method, so I can define the functor inside of the function itself (each functor is only used within one function).

void function() {
   struct functor{
      functor( type & member ) : m_member( member ) {}
      void operator()( ... ) {...}
      type & m_member;
   };
   use_functor( functor(...) );
}

This seems somewhat improved, but still requires a lot more ugly code that I would like. For example I would like to get rid of the name of the functor altogether. I know it is possible to create an anonymous struct, if I only ever use one value.

void function() {
   struct{
      // functor( type member ) : m_member( member ) {}
      void operator()( ... ) {...}
      // type & m_member;
   } callback ;
   use_functor( callback );
}

However at this point I have no clue on how to provide the necessary data members. Since the struct is anonymous it does not have a constructor. I could easily set the member, because it is public, but again this would add a line which I dislike.

The goal is to leave it in a state that as little as possible needs to be changed once we switch to a compiler that has clean lambdas which would allow to eliminate this problem altogether.

How would you go about doing this?

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As I just had to find out, some older GCCs do not even handle conversions from structs nested in function to std::function<> very well, and will not like any of the solutions. So I am forced to use option one and separate the logic. –  LiKao Nov 4 '11 at 12:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With regards to the initalisation of the member variables of an anonymous struct without a constructor you can do:

void function() {
   type the_thing;
   struct {
      void operator()( ... ) {...}
      type & m_member;
   } callback = {the_thing};
   use_functor( callback );
}

to set the type & reference m_member in callback.

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You could try boost lambda library or boost::phoenix. They are both designed to do lambda style operations without actual lambda support. Since they are template based, errors can be difficult to debug when something doesn't work as expected.

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Expanding on the answer by awoodland:

#define MY_LAMBDA(name, memberType, memberValue, body) \
    struct {                                     \
        void operator()( ... ) body              \
        memberType & memberValue;                   \
    } name = {memberValue}

void function() {
    type thing_to_capture;

    MY_LAMBDA(callback, type, thing_to_capture
    {
        std::cout << thing_to_capture << std::endl;
    });

    use_functor( callback );
}

You can use MY_LAMBDA anywhere you can define a struct. Unfortunately, without variadic macros, you have to wrap all captured objects into a single object, and you have to specify the type of that object in the "lambda declaration"

Also note that the equivalent using a lambda would be:

void function() {
    type thing_to_capture;

    auto callback = [&thing_to_capture]()
    {
        std::cout << thing_to_capture << std::endl;
    };

    use_functor( callback );
}
share|improve this answer
    
To eliminate the chance of typos, you could add type thing_to_capture; to the top of the macro (if you are not calling an explicit c'tor nor copy-assigning, as in this example). –  Richard Nov 3 '11 at 18:55
1  
How is MY_LAMBDA useful without the ability to specify the definition of operator()? –  ildjarn Nov 3 '11 at 19:22
    
@ildjarn Good point... Edit forthcoming. –  Michael Price Nov 3 '11 at 19:35

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