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In base graphics I can create a 4 panel pane of graphics by doing the following:

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
for (i in 1:4){
  plot(density(rnorm(100)))
}

which results in

enter image description here

I'd like to do the same sort of thing with ggplot2, but I can't figure out how to do it. I can't use facets because my real data, unlike this trivial example, is in very different structures and I want two graphs to be point charts and two to be histograms. How can do create panels or panes in ggplot2?

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2  
There is a good solution to this here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1532535/… –  Andrie Nov 3 '11 at 11:04
1  
Similar question: stackoverflow.com/q/3305613/602276 –  Andrie Nov 3 '11 at 11:06
8  
It seems that suggestion #6 on this answer applies to JD Long himself. That makes my day. :) –  Iterator Nov 3 '11 at 13:06
    
@Iterator: this is hilarious. Thanks for sharing! –  Matt Bannert Nov 3 '11 at 14:20
    
HA! Excellent. In Stack Overflow, much like in the economy as a whole, self serving behavior can have positive externalities! –  JD Long Nov 7 '11 at 16:15
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3 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Following Josh O'Brien's example: I'm surprised no one has mentioned grid.arrange from the gridExtra package yet:

library(gridExtra)
grid.arrange(q1,q2,q3,q4,q5,q6,nrow=3)

This seems to be mentioned here: multiple graphs in one canvas using ggplot2

For me, it's much easier than remembering all the viewport stuff.

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Great pointer. Nothing beats an already-packaged function, and I like that it's also set up to take options to grid.layout(). –  Josh O'Brien Nov 3 '11 at 16:00
3  
grid.arrange comes with a couple of enhancements to multiplot, e.g. i) handling of grid/lattice objects; ii) compatible with ggsave; iii) layout parameters; iv) default nrow/ncol; v) arrangeGrob version to avoid immediate drawing; vi) placeholders for titles on either sides; vii) as.table argument to reverse the drawing order. –  baptiste Nov 3 '11 at 19:12
    
@baptiste, using grid.arrange to plot 2 graphics and saving them with ggsave resulted in only one graphic being saved on a pdf file. Are you sure that grid is compatible with ggsave? –  Eduardo Jun 4 '13 at 11:23
1  
@Eduardo you're sort of hijacking an old answer here, but in short: use ggsave(file = "whatever.pdf", arrangeGrob(p1, p2, p3)) and a recent version of gridExtra. grid.arrange only displays, arrangeGrob is what you need to store the object. ggsave internally keeps track of the latest ggplot2 printed, but grid.arrange doesn't. –  baptiste Jun 4 '13 at 11:33
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EDIT: { Ben Bolker points to an even better option -- grid.arrange from the gridExtra package. If you're a ggplot2 user, though, the R Cookbook site is still worth a click-through. }

There's code for a nice multiplot function on this page of the R Cookbook (definitely worth a visit) that's useful for this sort of thing. Quoting directly from that site:

multiplot <- function(..., plotlist=NULL, cols) {
    require(grid)

    # Make a list from the ... arguments and plotlist
    plots <- c(list(...), plotlist)

    numPlots = length(plots)

    # Make the panel
    plotCols = cols                       # Number of columns of plots
    plotRows = ceiling(numPlots/plotCols) # Number of rows needed, calculated from # of cols

    # Set up the page
    grid.newpage()
    pushViewport(viewport(layout = grid.layout(plotRows, plotCols)))
    vplayout <- function(x, y)
        viewport(layout.pos.row = x, layout.pos.col = y)

    # Make each plot, in the correct location
    for (i in 1:numPlots) {
        curRow = ceiling(i/plotCols)
        curCol = (i-1) %% plotCols + 1
        print(plots[[i]], vp = vplayout(curRow, curCol ))
    }

}

Trying it out with 6 plots in a 3-by-2 layout (four of JD Long's plots, and two bonus ones!):

set.seed(2)
q1 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q2 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q3 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q4 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q5 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q6 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()

multiplot(q1, q2, q3, q4, q5, q6, cols=2)

gives this figure:

enter image description here

If the function doesn't quite fit your needs, at least it gives you a nice starting point!

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1  
Great link and examples! –  Iterator Nov 3 '11 at 14:08
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Thanks to Andrie's comments and Harlan's answer to my previous question (!), I whipped up this solution which accomplishes what I was after:

set.seed(2)
q1 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q2 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q3 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()
q4 <- ggplot(data.frame(x=rnorm(50)), aes(x)) + geom_density()

grid.newpage()
pushViewport(viewport(layout=grid.layout(2,2)))
vplayout <- function(x,y) viewport(layout.pos.row=x,layout.pos.col=y)
print(q1,vp=vplayout(1,1))
print(q2,vp=vplayout(1,2))
print(q3,vp=vplayout(2,1))
print(q4,vp=vplayout(2,2))

which yields:

enter image description here

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1  
Added bonus: your plots appear to have gained a mode. :) –  Iterator Nov 3 '11 at 12:55
    
small sample sizes are a bitch :) –  JD Long Nov 4 '11 at 10:52
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