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I'm working with libpcap in c / c + + and I have a problem when inserting pointers in a vector. This is my code:

    typedef vector <u_char *>vPack;
    ...
    vPack vect;
    ...
    if (pcap_dispatch (p, 0, &mycallback, (u_char *) &vect) < 0){
         cout << "Error" << endl;
          pcap_perror (p, prestr);
    }
    ....
    void mycallback (u_char * args, const struct pcap_pkthdr *pkthdr, const u_char * packet){
          u_char *pk;
          pk = (u_char *)packet;
          vPack *vec = (vPack *) args;
          vec[0].push_back(pk);
        }

The problem is that the elements are inserted in the same memory location, and the vector always contains the same element. Any suggestions?

PD: sorry for my english.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

extending Karrek's attempt!

struct packet_handler
{
  typedef std::vector<u_char> PacketType;
  typedef std::vector <PacketType> PacketBuffer;

  static void handler(u_char *user, const pcap_pkthdr *h, const u_char *bytes)
  {
    packet_handler* ph = reinterpret_cast<packet_handler*>(user);
    ph->handle(PacketType(bytes, bytes + h->caplen));
  }

  void handle(PacketType const& packet)
  {
    _packetBuffer.push_back(packet);
  }

  PacketBuffer _packetBuffer;
};

int main()
{
  packet_handler ph;
  // pass in the handler class as user data
  int result = pcap_dispatch(p, 0, packet_handler::handler, reinterpret_cast<uchar*>(&ph));
}
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when I do this I get a compilation error: - In static member function 'static void packet_handler:: handler (u_char *, const pcap_pkthdr *, const u_char *)': - Error: request for member 'handle' in 'ph', which is of type 'packet_handler *' that is not class how I can fix it? thank you very much for the help. –  user1027524 Nov 3 '11 at 20:32
    
@user1027524, oops, typo in code - fixed now.. –  Nim Nov 4 '11 at 8:44
    
it works, thanks! –  user1027524 Nov 4 '11 at 10:02
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In mycallback the argument packet is a const u_char - buffer. This pointer points to an libpcap-internal data buffer which is reused for every packet which has matched your filter (and your callback is called). You have to create your own buffer and copy the packet-data into it.

For example:

u_char *b = malloc(pkthdr->caplen);
memcpy(b, pk, pkthdr->caplen);
vec[0].push_back(b);
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vec[0].push_back()!! Surely vec->push_back() is better? –  trojanfoe Nov 3 '11 at 11:43
    
Even using is vector for is questionable. I simply answered the question by sticking as closely to OP's code. –  Patrick B. Nov 3 '11 at 11:46
    
@PatrickB - why is a vector questionable? –  Nim Nov 3 '11 at 13:00
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You have to copy the data to a freshly allocated piece of memory:

void mycallback (u_char * args, const struct pcap_pkthdr *pkthdr, const u_char * packet)
{
    u_char *pk = new u_char [pkthdr->caplen];
    memcpy(pk, packet, pkthdr->caplen);
    vPack *vec = (vPack *) args;
    vec->push_back(pk);
}

However there are important issues to consider:

  • When destroying your vector you must iterate through each element and explicitly delete it, in order to recover memory.
  • You don't know long each packet is within the vector. You really need a class that stores both the data and its length and then store a vector of these objects instead.
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What a mess! Let's make a C++ answer, using the documentation:

typedef std::vector <u_char*> VPack;

void handler(u_char *user, const pcap_pkthdr *h, const u_char *bytes)
{
  VPack & v = *reinterpret_cast<VPack*>(user);
  v.insert(v.end(), bytes, bytes + h->caplen);
}

int main()
{
  VPack v;
  // ... populate p ...
  int result = pcap_dispatch(p, 0, handler, reinterpret_cast<uchar*>(&v));
}

The only noteworth point here is that we pass a pointer to v through the user argument, so we have to do some type-unsafe casting on both ends. That's just the hallmark of using a C callback function, though.

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you're constructing one continuous buffer with all the bytes rather than a vector of individual packets. –  Nim Nov 3 '11 at 12:58
    
That's true. You're welcome to pass in separate vectors, if that's what's required. Then again, if you can figure out the OP's precise requirements, I will gladly cede the question plus all attendant reputation to you :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 3 '11 at 13:00
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