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Looking for a delphi library or code snippet that will do deep object comparison for me, preferably 2010 RTTI based as my objects don't inherit from TComponent. Does anyone know where I can find one, I'm developing a test framework in DUnit and need something solid which will point out exactly which field is causing problems (serialization comparison leaves it a bit vague).

Cheers,

Barry

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5  
serialization to a text format (XML, JSON) and doing a TDiff (angusj.com/delphi) would be easy –  mjn Nov 3 '11 at 12:39
1  
How about DFM format :-) It's like a JSON precursor... from 1995. –  Warren P Nov 3 '11 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Sort of solved this myself, implemented as a class helper for TObject so can be used everywhere if people want it. D2010 and up due to RTTI but you may be able to convert it to use original RTTI stuff.

Code below may be buggy as originally mine was for DUnit and had lots of checks in it instead of changing the result and doesn't support TCollections or a load of other special cases but can be adapted for that by using the if-elseif-then switch in the middle.

If you have any suggestions and additions please don't hesitate to comment so I can add them to it so other people can use this.

Have fun coding

Barry

unit TObjectHelpers;

interface
   uses classes, rtti;

type

TObjectHelpers = class Helper for TObject
  function DeepEquals (const aObject : TObject) : boolean;
end;

implementation

uses sysutils, typinfo;

{ TObjectHelpers }

function TObjectHelpers.DeepEquals(const aObject: TObject): boolean;
var
  c : TRttiContext;
  t : TRttiType;
  p : TRttiProperty;
begin

  result := true;

  if self = aObject then
    exit; // Equal as same pointer

  if (self = nil) and (aObject = nil) then
    exit; // equal as both non instanced

  if (self = nil) and (aObject <> nil) then
  begin
    result := false;
    exit; // one nil other non nil fail
  end;

  if (self <> nil) and (aObject = nil) then
  begin
     result := false;
     exit; // one nil other non nil fail
  end;

  if self.ClassType <> aObject.ClassType then
  begin
     result := false;
     exit;
  end;

  c := TRttiContext.Create;
  try
    t := c.GetType(aObject.ClassType);

    for p in t.GetProperties do
    begin

       if ((p.GetValue(self).IsObject)) then
       begin

          if not TObject(p.GetValue(self).AsObject).DeepEquals(TObject(p.GetValue(aObject).AsObject)) then
          begin
      result := false;
      exit;
    end;

  end
  else if AnsiSameText(p.PropertyType.Name, 'DateTime') or AnsiSameText(p.PropertyType.Name, 'TDateTime') then
  begin

    if p.GetValue(self).AsExtended <> p.GetValue(aObject).AsExtended then
    begin
      result := false;
      exit;
    end;

  end
  else if AnsiSameText(p.PropertyType.Name, 'Boolean') then
  begin

    if p.GetValue(self).AsBoolean <> p.GetValue(aObject).AsBoolean then
    begin
      result := false;
      exit;
    end;

  end
  else if AnsiSameText(p.PropertyType.Name, 'Currency') then
  begin

     if p.GetValue(self).AsExtended <> p.GetValue(aObject).AsExtended then
     begin
        result := false;
        exit;
     end;

  end
  else if p.PropertyType.TypeKind = tkInteger then
  begin

    if p.GetValue(self).AsInteger <> p.GetValue(aObject).AsInteger then
    begin
      result := false;
      exit;
    end;

  end
  else if p.PropertyType.TypeKind = tkInt64 then
  begin

    if p.GetValue(self).AsInt64 <> p.GetValue(aObject).AsInt64  then
    begin
      result := false;
      exit;
    end;

  end
  else if p.PropertyType.TypeKind = tkEnumeration then
  begin

    if p.GetValue(self).AsOrdinal <> p.GetValue(aObject).AsOrdinal then
    begin
      result := false;
      exit;
    end;

  end
  else
  begin

    if p.GetValue(self).AsVariant <> p.GetValue(aObject).AsVariant then
    begin
      result := false;
      exit;
    end;

  end;

end;

 finally
   c.Free;
  end;

 end;

 end.
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3  
How about non-significant versus significant differences? (Examples: would you ever have a case where you want to ignore differences like window handle values, etc? Could you add an exclusion-attribute so that the deep comparison skips some things? –  Warren P Nov 3 '11 at 15:41
1  
This breaks when someone makes type redefinitions for the types you identify by name. You rather should compare the TypeInfo of these types. –  Stefan Glienke Nov 10 '11 at 7:34
    
Or used NOWHERE if people are already using their own (or somebody else's) class helper for TObject. For crying out loud, when will people STOP using class helpers for things that unit level functions/procedures are plenty good enough and more than reasonable for !! It really does seem as if people are so desperate to find a legitimate use for class helpers that they will throw them at every problem - for 99% of which they are wholly inappropriate. –  Deltics Nov 10 '11 at 19:50
    
yes breaks when someone redefines types, but as I said quick & dirty code. If you're redefining DateTime/Boolean/Currency I think you'll have the skills neccessary to look at the code given above and modify it to suit your taste –  Barry Nov 14 '11 at 10:28

Consider using OmniXML persistence.

For XML differencing, I have written a utility using OmniXML that will do an XML diff, and there are many XML comparison tools out there.

I used OmniXML to do an XML differencing tool for exactly this purpose, and it worked great for me. Unfortunately that tool contains many domain specific things and is closed-source and belongs to a former employer so I cannot post the code.

My comparision tool had a simple algorithm:

  1. Match and build a map of Object1->Object2 node links between matching XML nodes.
  2. Sort every node on a primary key (domain specific knowledge) making XML order unimportant. Since you are not only comparing TComponents with Names, you will need to find a way to establish every objects identity if you want to be able to compare it.
  3. Report items in xml doc 1 that are not in xml doc 2.
  4. Report items in xml doc 2 that are not in xml doc 1.
  5. Report items in xml doc 1 with subkeys or attributes different than xml doc2.
  6. visual tool used two Virtual Tree View controls, and worked a lot like KDIFF3 but as a treeview.
share|improve this answer
    
Thats a good solution but still a bit too much overhead and complex for my liking especially when used in a DUnit test. I think I've just written something that will do the job I'll post it in a bit –  Barry Nov 3 '11 at 14:50
1  
It's exactly how i used it; DUnit. It created a lot of unit-test output files on disk which was exactly what I needed to find, understand, and fix the regressions that were happening. Data is power. –  Warren P Nov 3 '11 at 15:39
    
ah fair enough, just different styles really. The test suite has to be used by a few people so would rather make it obvious to the coder who is working on it upfront than have to go through files and check. –  Barry Nov 3 '11 at 17:17

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