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I have a problem of calling the constructors in boost::variant. Suppose I have two classes "abc" and "asd" and I have an object declaration something like-

class abc
{
   int var;
   float var2;
   public: abc(int a)
           {
             var = a;
            }
   public: abc(inta, float b)
            :var(a), var2(b)
            {}
 };

 class asd
 {
   int var;
   public: asd(int a)
           {
               var = a;
           }
  };

typedef boost::variant<abc,asd> def;
int main()
{
    def my_object;
}

my problem is how do I call the constructor of the object my_object?

share|improve this question
1  
You have a typo in abc, which means that this is not your real testcase. (Also, your indentation is broken.) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 3 '11 at 12:16
    
-1 for not reading the "Basic Usage" page in the Boost Variant documentation. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 3 '11 at 12:17
    
I am sorry for the typo.. actually I directly wrote the code in the editor, and my actual program is very big to be pasted here.. –  ankith13 Nov 3 '11 at 12:21
    
@ankith13: Set your editor to indent with spaces instead of tabs to avoid problems like this. –  Emile Cormier Nov 3 '11 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

From the manual (you must have missed it):

a variant can be constructed directly from any value convertible to one of its bounded types

And:

Similarly, a variant can be assigned any value convertible to one of its bounded types

So:

def my_object = asd(3); // or `def my_object(asd(3));`
my_object = abc(4);
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for pointing it out –  ankith13 Nov 3 '11 at 12:18

A variant is not some multiply-derived custom type, and has its own constructors defined instead. The idiomatic way is to just assign one of the variant types:

typedef boost::variant<abc,asd> def;
int main()
{
    def my_object = abc(1);

    my_object = abc(1, .4);
}

If you wanted to actually use constructor without without copy-initialization (allthough most compilers will elide the copy) you can write:

def my_object(abc(1,.4));
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your quick response... –  ankith13 Nov 3 '11 at 12:17
1  
Rather than "without assignment" it should probably be "without copy-initialization", since there's never any assignment :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 3 '11 at 12:25
    
@KerrekSB: yeah that was the word I was looking for. –  sehe Nov 3 '11 at 12:26

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