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I made this program just out of interest and wanted to make it better. My problem is that I want to make a nested for-loop to carry out the iterations but I can't get my head around it, I have tried many times but my head is melting. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Also for some reason on windows and openSuse (from what I have seen) the program prints out some random characters after the expected output, a solution to this would be a great bonus. Thanks !

Sorry I didn't make it clearer, the point of the code is to be able to theoretically generate every combination of letters from AAAAAAAA to ZZZZZZZZ.

1) No it's not homework

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    char pass [] = {'A','A','A','A','A','A','A','A'};
    while(pass[0] != '[')
    {
        pass[7]++;

        if(pass[7]=='[')
        {
            pass[6]++;
            pass[7] = 'A';
        }
        if(pass[6] == '[')
        {
            pass[6] = 'A';
            pass[5]++;
        }
        if(pass[5] == '[')
        {
            pass[5] = 'A';
            pass[4]++;
        }
        if(pass[4] == '[')
        {
            pass[4] = 'A';
            pass[3]++;
        }
        if(pass[3] == '[')
        {
            pass[3] = 'A';
            pass[2]++;
        }
        if(pass[2] == '[')
        {
            pass[2] = 'A';
            pass[1]++;
        }
        if(pass[1] == '[')
        {

            pass[1] = 'A';
            pass[0]++;
        }

        cout << pass << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
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2  
Is this homework? If so, please tag it as such. –  Björn Pollex Nov 3 '11 at 12:27
1  
I don't get the point of your code, what are you trying to do? –  mister why Nov 3 '11 at 12:28
3  
About your second question, change your initialization to {'A','A','A','A','A','A','A','A','\0'}, and it will work. You are treating the array as a C-string when printing it. It is therefore expected to be terminated by a '\0'. –  Björn Pollex Nov 3 '11 at 12:28
1  
The random output is because you print it like a C string, but it's not terminated. You need to add a literal zero at the end of the array. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 3 '11 at 12:28
2  
Is this Baby's First Password Guesser? Trying to get past Dad's internet filter? ;-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 3 '11 at 12:30

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maybe like this:

const char char_first = 'A';
const char char_last = '[';
const unsigned int passlen = 8;

while (pass[0] != char_last)
{
  ++pass[passlen - 1];

  for (unsigned int i = passlen - 1; i != 0; --i)
  {
    if (pass[i] == char_last)
    {
        ++pass[i - 1]; // OK, i is always > 0
        pass[i] = char_first;
    }
  }
}

For printing, include <string> and say:

std::cout << std::string(pass, passlen) << std::endl;

I took the liberty of making a few of the magic numbers into constants. If you're ever going to refactor this into a separate function, you'll see the merit of this.

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Ah this is perfect, thanks very much for the reply.. this will help me get into my Dad's internet in a matter of years :) !!! –  Tom celic Nov 3 '11 at 17:17
    
No problem -- good luck! Coming to think of it, @Basile's idea of appending a zero byte to the array may be a good idea because you avoid constructing the string object each time (though the printing to console will be by orders of magnitude slower than this small extra step). –  Kerrek SB Nov 3 '11 at 17:18

Since (to output it) you use pass as a C string, it should be null terminated. Since it is not, garbage is printed. So you could define it as: char pass [] = {'A','A','A','A','A','A','A','A','\0'}; or simpler char pass[] = "AAAAAAAAA";

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Thanks for the reply mate, should have seen that ! –  Tom celic Nov 3 '11 at 17:27

I'd forget about carrying on my own and just convert to/from numbers. What you're doing here is basically printing a numbers whose digits range from 'A' to ']', mappable to 0-28 via the magic of ASCII (why no ^ in passwords?)

Printing the number of anything then really boils down to

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

std::string format(long num, int ndigits) {
        if(ndigits == 0) {
                return "";
        } else {
                char digit = 'A' + num % 28;
                return format(num / 28, ndigits - 1) + digit;
        }
}

int main()
{
        for(int i = 0 ; i < powl(28,8) ; ++i) {
                cout << format(i, 8) << endl;
        }
}

You may still want to work in a char array instead of producing a billion temporary strings if you're serious about the loop, but the principle stays the same.

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First try to find the common parts in the expressions looking like

    if(pass[7]=='[')
    {
        pass[6]++;
        pass[7] = 'A';
    }

You should think along a line like "There's always the same number here, and a one-lower number there". Then, you replace that notion of a number with a variable and find out which range the variable has. KerrekSB gave you a solution, try to arrive at similar code from your own reasoning.

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You just have to play a bit with your while and make it fit a for-loop.

while(pass[0] != '[') becomes for (i=0; pass[0] != '['; i++)

then you can replace all ifs with only one:

    if(pass[i+1] == '[')
    {

        pass[i+1] = 'A';
        pass[i]++;
    }

How did we come to that conclusion? Well if you check all your if-statements all that changes between them is the indices. You can see clearly that pattern so you just replace the indices with a variable.

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For starters, this is definitely not a case for a nested loop. In fact, your entire code boils down to:

pass = initialPattern();
while ( isValidPattern( pass ) ) {
    nextPattern( pass );
    std::cout << pass << std::endl;
}

(But I wonder if you don't really mean to do the output before the increment.)

Now all you have to do is define the type of pass and relevant functions; you might even consider putting everything in a class, since all of the functions operate on the same data instance.

Judging from your code, pass should be an std::string with 8 characters; the initialization could be written:

std::string pass( 8, 'A' );

isValidPattern apparently only looks at the first character. (I'm not sure that's correct, but that's what your code does.) Something like:

bool
isValidPattern( std::string const& pattern )
{
    return pattern[0] != '[';
}

according to your code, but something like:

struct NotIsUpper
{
    bool operator()( char ch ) const
    {
        return ! ::isupper( static_cast<unsigned char>( ch ) );
    }
};

bool
isValidPattern( std::string const& pattern )
{
    return pattern.size() == 8
        && std::find_if( pattern.begin(), pattern.end(), NotIsUpper() )
                == pattern.end();
}

would seem more appropriate. (Of course, if you're doing any sort of coding with text, you'd already have NotIsUpper and its siblings in your tool kit.)

Finally, nextPattern seems to be nothing more than a multi-digit increment, where the data is stored in big-endian order. So the following (classical) algorithm would seem appropriate:

void
nextPattern( std::string& pattern )
{
    static char const firstDigit = 'A';
    static char const lastDigit = 'Z';
    static std::string const invalidPattern( 1, '[' );

    std::string::reverse_iterator current = pattern.rbegin();
    std::string::reverse_iterator end = pattern.rend();
    while ( current != end && *current == lastDigit ) {
        *current = firstDigit;
        ++ current;
    }
    if ( current != end ) {
        ++ *current;
    } else {
        pattern = invalidPattern;
    }
}

Formally, there is no guarantee in the standard that the letters will be encoded in sequential ascending order, so for maximum portability, you probably should in fact use an std::vector<int> with values in the range [0, 26), and map those to letters just befor output. This would be trivial if you put all of these operations in a class, since the internal representation wouldn't be visible to the client code. Something like:

class PatternGenerator
{
    std::vector<int> myData;
public:
    explicit PatternGenerator()
        : myData( 8, 0 )
    {
    }

    void next()
    {
        static int const lastDigit = 26;

        std::vector<int>::reverse_iterator current = pattern.rbegin();
        std::vector<int>::reverse_iterator end = pattern.rend();
        while ( current != end && *current == lastDigit - 1 ) {
            *current = 0;
            ++ current;
        }
        if ( current != end ) {
            ++ *current;
        } else {
            myData.front() = lastDigit;
        }
    }

    bool isValid() const
    {
        return myData.front() < lastDigit;
    }

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(
        std::ostream& dest, PatternGenerator const& obj )
    {
        static char const characterMap[] = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
        for ( std::vector<int>::iterator current = obj.myData.current();
                current != obj.myData.end():
                ++ current ) {
            dest << characterMap[*current];
        }
        return dest;
    }
};

(Note that things like isValid become simpler, because they can depend on the class invariants.)

Given this, all you have to write is:

int
main()
{
    PatternGenerator pass;
    while ( pass.isValid() ) {
        std::cout << pass << std::endl;
        pass.next();
    }
    return 0;
}
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Is this some attempt to troll the student for not doing homework? I can instantly visualize the nested-loop solution and this is a perfectly valid use case. Of course, I'm not going to produce a full code listing for it either, but... –  Karl Knechtel Nov 3 '11 at 13:34
    
@KarlKnechtel No, although I'll admit that the class based solution might be going a bit far for a simple homework assignment (but it's good to show students how such things would be written in industry). However, this is definitely not a case for nested loops, as should be obvious from my explication. If you're thinking in terms of nested loops, you're not breaking the problem down sufficiently to write correct and maintainable code. The problem of incrementing the pattern is quite independent of that of looping over all patterns, and should be separated. –  James Kanze Nov 3 '11 at 15:08
    
I think of the loop indices as encoding the pattern, so... :/ Regardless, it appears as though the OP's primary interest is in figuring out how to work through the logic of nested loops. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 3 '11 at 17:48

To do nested loops, you need to turn it inside-out.

You've written the code thinking as follows: go through all the possibilities for the last symbol, then change the second-last once and go back, etc. That's like counting up from 1, getting to 10 and putting a 1 in the tens column, etc.

Nested loops work the other way: go through the possibilities for the first symbol, allowing the inner loops to take care of possibilities for the other symbols each time. i.e., "list all those numbers, in order, that start with 0 in the millions place, then the ones that start with 1 etc.". In the outermost loop, you just set that value for the first digit, and the nested loops take care of the rest.

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