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static gboolean
gst_fd_src_start (GstBaseSrc * bsrc)
{
  GstFdSrc *src = GST_FD_SRC (bsrc);

  src->curoffset = 0;

  if ((src->fdset = gst_poll_new (TRUE)) == NULL)
    goto socket_pair;

  gst_fd_src_update_fd (src, -1);

  return TRUE;

  /* ERRORS */
socket_pair:
  {
    GST_ELEMENT_ERROR (src, RESOURCE, OPEN_READ_WRITE, (NULL),
        GST_ERROR_SYSTEM);
    return FALSE;
  }
}

why here someone has used goto socket_pair;i am not getting why this mechanism is used ? why dont we just write error message there and return ?

note: this is gstreamer plugin code

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8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In larger routines there might be multiple points in the function which need to goto the error handling code. This routine should be seen in the context of having been written according to code conventions that mandate a common form for error handling.

It's true that goto should be considered dangerous but for a language like C which has no exception handling it can be the least bad option for error handling.

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so what should be the other ways for error handling ? writing same error code everywhere? –  Mr.32 Nov 3 '11 at 12:45
    
@mr.32 same code everywhere never a good option. Could use macros perhaps but goto in many cases is best. –  David Heffernan Nov 3 '11 at 13:22
1  
In my experience, if you can't do all of your checking of failure conditions early in the function, and you find that you have numerous places you can fail in you function that require the same error handling, you can look at breaking the function into two or more smaller functions. This will in turn make the error handling simpler. Functions that are large with many places you can fail are often times more complex than they need to be and thus harder to maintain. In short, consider refactoring before resorting to goto's. –  Lou Nov 3 '11 at 18:14
    
@Lou Have you read the Linux source code recently? –  David Heffernan Nov 3 '11 at 18:29
    
@David No and I hope to never have to do so:) I think OS development is a completely different beast from typical application development. –  Lou Nov 3 '11 at 19:46

In the code you've quoted, there basically isn't any good reason for it.

In general, though, you'll sometimes see an "error handling" label at the bottom of a function if the function needs to do more than one thing on failure (e.g., not just returning an error code), or if the coding standards require a single return for every function (some government work does this). The main body code then uses goto to trigger the error handling when it needs to. This is sort of a poor man's try/catch/finally thing.

So for instance:

int someNiftyFunction() {
    int rv = 0;

    acquireSomeResource();

    if (some_failure_condition) {
        rv = -1;
        goto error_out;
    }

    if (some_other_failure_condition) {
        rv = -2;
        goto error_out;
    }

    if (yet)_another_failure_condition) {
        rv = -3;
        goto error_out;
    }

    setUpSuccessStuff();

exit:
    cleanUpSomeResource();
    return rv;

error_out:

    setUpFailureStuff();
    logSomeValuableInfo();
    goto exit;
}

There, basically everything from acquireSomeResource() through to the exit: label is very roughly a try block, the exit: label is the finally, and the error_out is the catch. Very roughly. :-)

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if this is in old fashioned C which doesn't have exception handling built in as a language structure, this idiom is a good way to simulate it.

imagine there were 10 early exit conditions. if you wanted to code each one as a return statement you would have to repeat the call to GST_ELEMENT_ERROR 10 times, whereas using the goto means you only need to put it once.

obviously in this case there is only 1 early exit condition but it's usually better to implement this idiom all the way through the code rather than only in functions that strictly need it

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This is a common way in C to separate the error handling and cleaning up from the normal code. In other languages you would use some kind of structured exception instead. This is a cleaner way to do it in C. In more complex situations the benefit is more visible. In many cases the error handling/cleanup code would have to be called from different places. Refactoring it does not make much sense I think that goto is not that evil if you use it in C for that sake. In other programming languages having better mechanisms, you should of course avoid the use of goto...

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This may be done to have common code for processing socket error. In this particular case is needed only in one case and there might be no need to use goto in this case, but only for consistency reasons (general approach for all code base).

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As mentioned above if you look only this function, it is meaningless. However if you have a function with many error situations and with some cleaning issues before exiting function, this kind of programming is inevitable, otherwise your code will increase for all error issues or some cleaning issues. To make programming more structural, sometimes all functions could be written with goto destructor, like the code you mention.

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ya man..in that file every where all error are same way handled .. –  Mr.32 Nov 3 '11 at 12:46

goto has no advantages (except exit nested loops). Some people may argue that here error-handling is separated form logic. But i whould write it as:

static gboolean
gst_fd_src_start (GstBaseSrc * bsrc)
{
  GstFdSrc *src = GST_FD_SRC (bsrc);

  src->curoffset = 0;

  if ((src->fdset = gst_poll_new (TRUE)) == NULL)
  {
GST_ELEMENT_ERROR (src, RESOURCE, OPEN_READ_WRITE, (NULL),
    GST_ERROR_SYSTEM);
return FALSE;
  }



  gst_fd_src_update_fd (src, -1);

  return TRUE;
}
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As was pointed out in other answers, it doesn't do much in the simple example; its benefits are more apparent when there are multiple resources to aquire, and multiple error conditions. This pseudocode demonstrates this:

boolean allocate_resources (ObjectA **a, ObjectB **b, ObjectC **c)
{
    *a = allocate_a();
    if (*a == NULL) {
        LOG_ERROR("failed to allocate A");
        goto fail0;
    }

    *b = allocate_b();
    if (*b == NULL) {
        LOG_ERROR("failed to allocate B");
        goto fail1;
    }

    *c = allocate_c();
    if (*c == NULL) {
        LOG_ERROR("failed to allocate C");
        goto fail2;
    }

    return true;

fail2:
    release_b(*b);
fail1:
    release_a(*a);
fail0:
    return false;
}

Note how the above function works atomically as seen from the outside - when it returns, either all resources are allocated, or none of them, avoiding leaks.

Compare this to one possible version that uses nesting instead of goto:

// Bad style. Don't do this.
boolean allocate_resources (ObjectA **a, ObjectB **b, ObjectC **c)
{
    *a = allocate_a();
    if (*a == NULL) {
        LOG_ERROR("failed to allocate A");
    } else {
        *b = allocate_b();
        if (*b == NULL) {
            LOG_ERROR("failed to allocate B");
        } else {
            *c = allocate_c();
            if (*c == NULL) {
                LOG_ERROR("failed to allocate C");
            } else {
                return true;
            }

            release_b(*b);
        }

        release_a(*a);
    }

    return false;
}

This version is much harder to read. In the goto version, it's obvious at first look what the primary execution path will be; here' it is not. The nesting makes code harder to read and also wastes horizontal space.

Hopefully I didn't mess it up and it's functionally equivalent to the goto example; I suggest you try to prove yourself that it is equivalent, and see for yourself how harder it is to work with.

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