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I would like to have a git repository that consists mainly of binary files.

I need to keep track of the changed, added and removed files to the repository, but I don't want for git to version the content of the files themselves.

In other words, I just need for git to keep track of changes (change log), but not the content.

Is this even possible with git?

Should I be using something else for this?

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Why don't you want the content to be tracked specifically? –  ssg Jan 31 '11 at 11:46
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I don't know what @Dema's reasons are, but git-annex describes two use cases for this: git-annex.branchable.com –  toolbear Apr 21 '11 at 22:26
    
This is a dupe of stackoverflow.com/questions/540535/… –  dbw Feb 26 '13 at 22:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

git is a content tracker, so if you don't want to track content it sounds like it's the wrong tool for the job. I'm not sure exactly how you would track changes to files without tracking their content, though.

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I disagree that it's the wrong tool; git is also a user space file system with many "plumbing" commands available so it can be used in novel ways beyond version control of content –  toolbear May 13 '11 at 6:44
    
I'm facing a similar problem... do you have any suggestions to the "right" tool for tracking many binary files? –  eykanal Jan 6 '12 at 14:30
    
-1 for toolbear. Git is not for tracking binary files (in its straight use )... and what is that "user space file system" ???? –  voila Dec 14 '13 at 2:48

Mined from @Tobu's answer to this related question:

To version and propagate binary files without actually storing them in git, try git-annex.

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very interesting project, thanx –  Casey Apr 22 '11 at 0:55

If you don't want to store the bins, than you could use a binary diff tool on the files, then commit the output into version control. Any text change log entries can then be entered in to the commit message.

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Maybe I don't understand your question but what if you store in a text file the timestamp of all files? Then, you could store in version control only that file, and let your VCS diff the different versions of it.

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