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how to get the value "18.18181818181818" from SQLSERVER

SELECT (2/11)*100

I userd this Code but it gives me 0 why ??

in the calculator it's giving me "18.18181818181818" !!

is there any missing thing in my code?

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3  
Without knowing which SQL server you're using, but probably 2/11 is casted as integer 0. Try 2.0/11 instead. –  Jens Erat Nov 3 '11 at 13:08
    
thank you all guys –  HAJJAJ Nov 3 '11 at 13:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are getting a zero, because you are performing integer math.

Try changing one of your integer constants to a decimal constant and you will get what you expect:

SELECT 2./11*100 -- To simplify the expression, I removed the parentheses 
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1  
I was going to suggest using CAST or CONVERT to force SQL Server to recognize the numbers as non-integral types, but your method does the same thing in a lot less code. +1. –  David Stratton Nov 3 '11 at 13:10
SELECT (2.0/11)*100

Try that. Putting the decimal there makes SQL Server use decimal datatype instead of int like you are seeing.

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SQL server is treating your numbers as INT's, you need to cast them as FLOAT's (or add decimal points to your numbers, I think that would fix it too).

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SQL Server is inferring the data types to be integers, and performing integer calculations - 2/11 == 0; 0 * 100 == 0

Had you done:

SELECT (2.0/11.0)*100

You'd have got it to infer floating point calculations and gotten a result of 18.181800

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If you want control over the precision of your result, you should consider casting one of the numbers to a decimal:

SELECT CAST(2 AS DECIMAL(19,10))/11 * 100

Yields:

18.1818181818100
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