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I've got an MVC app which features a DropDownList and TextBox. I'm using MVC validation and I'm happy with it.

At the moment The DropDownList is [Required], but I want to make it so the TextBox can function as an 'other: please specify' style input for the DropDownList.

How do I make it so that the [Required] attribute on the DropDownList is conditional on the TextBox being empty?

This question is similar, but it's over a year old. Anything in the current version of MVC that makes this easy to do?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

It would be pretty easy to write a custom validation attribute:

public class RequiredIfPropertyIsEmptyAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    private readonly string _otherProperty;
    public RequiredIfPropertyIsEmptyAttribute(string otherProperty)
    {
        _otherProperty = otherProperty;
    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        var property = validationContext.ObjectType.GetProperty(_otherProperty);
        if (property == null)
        {
            return new ValidationResult(string.Format("Unknown property {0}", _otherProperty));
        }

        var otherPropertyValue = property.GetValue(validationContext.ObjectInstance, null);
        if (otherPropertyValue == null)
        {
            return base.IsValid(value, validationContext);
        }
        return null;
    }
}

then you could have a view model:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public string Foo { get; set; }

    [RequiredIfPropertyIsEmpty("Foo")]
    public string SelectedItemId { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Items {
        get
        {
            return new[] 
            {
                new SelectListItem { Value = "1", Text = "item 1" },
                new SelectListItem { Value = "2", Text = "item 2" },
                new SelectListItem { Value = "3", Text = "item 3" },
            };
        }
    }
}

A controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View(new MyViewModel());
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(MyViewModel model)
    {
        return View(model);
    }
}

And of course a view:

@model MyViewModel

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    <div>
        @Html.LabelFor(x => x.Foo)
        @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Foo)
    </div>
    <div>
        @Html.LabelFor(x => x.SelectedItemId)
        @Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedItemId, Model.Items, "-- select an item --")
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.SelectedItemId)
    </div>

    <input type="submit" value="OK" />
}

or you could do as I do: download and use the FluentValidation.NET library, forget about data annotations and write the following validation logic which seems pretty self-explanatory:

public class MyViewModelValidator: AbstractValidator<MyViewModel> 
{
    public MyViewModelValidator() 
    {
        RuleFor(x => x.SelectedItemId)
            .NotEmpty()
            .When(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.Foo));
    }
}

Just go ahead and Install-Package FluentValidation.MVC3 and make your life easier.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Fluent Validation is amazing. – Dismissile Nov 3 '11 at 14:23
    
Wouldn't the FluentValidation approach mean I'd have to write a separate validation class for ever ViewModel I use? I do admire the syntax, but it seems like I'd be making extra work for myself, writing a separate ModelValidator class and constructor containing RuleFor(x => x.name).NotNull() when I could just write [Required]? – roryok Nov 3 '11 at 14:24
    
Actually the first method above doesn't seem to work for me. No compile or runtime errors or anything, it just doesn't happen. Still catching the empty DropDownList even when the TextBox is populated. I might try FluentValidation after all – roryok Nov 3 '11 at 14:35
    
roryok - Wouldn't you be using separate data annotations for every ViewModel you write? – Dismissile Nov 3 '11 at 14:48
1  
@roryok, yes, with FluentValidation, it would mean separate class for performing validation. And that's the great part about it. Validation is separate from the view model. It can be also unit tested separately and in isolation. Believe me, once you have tried it you will never ever write a single data annotation anymore. – Darin Dimitrov Nov 3 '11 at 15:29

You can create a ConditionalAttribute.

ASP.net MVC conditional validation

ASP.NET MVC Conditional validation

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