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When i see man sqrt on Linux, I see 3 prototypes of the function -

double sqrt(double x);    
float sqrtf(float x);    
long double sqrtl(long double x);

If compiler/library is written in C++, I understand it might be using function overloading.

If the compiler library that provides this is written in C, How does the compiler(gcc) implement this kind of thing, which is like function overloading which C does not support? (Or is it that some later standard of C like C99 does support something like this?)

What programming language is gcc implemented in?

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1  
The functions have different names, so there is no need for overloading. –  Paul R Nov 3 '11 at 14:06
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Function overloading? Where? All these functions have different names... –  RedX Nov 3 '11 at 14:07
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I suppose you might call this "explicit name mangling". 8v) –  Fred Larson Nov 3 '11 at 14:08
    
gcc is implemented in C and C++, probably with some assembler, i'm guessing. –  Kevin Hsu Nov 3 '11 at 14:10
    
The functions have the same purpouse, but, if you watch closely, you will notice, they have DIFFERENT IDENTIFIERS, similar, but not equal –  umlcat Nov 3 '11 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The function names are simply chosen differently - plain sqrt for double and its friends sqrtf and sqrtl for floats and long doubles. It looks like overloading, but it isn't, because the function names are different.

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But in actual function calls we do not do sqrtf() or sqrtl().. right? We just call sqrt() but argument to this can be float,double,long double. How is that achieved was my query. Maybe i did not use correct words. –  goldenmean Nov 4 '11 at 15:33
    
If you use sqrt in a function call, its argument will be converted to double. If you use sqrtf, to float. If you want long double square root computations, you have to use sqrtl in the actual code. –  thiton Nov 4 '11 at 16:02

In Windows it has typically been handled by having a #define to rename the function name to a specific type depending on a definition

e.g.

#ifdef UNICODE
#define strlen wcslen
#else
#define strlen strlen
#endif
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In either C or C++ these are NOT the same functions. You have a separate variant of each.

In C++ (and other languages with overloading) the names of each variant can be the same but the compiler can keep them apart by the type of arguments/return values. (In fact: Under the hood a sort of auto-generated unique name is used that is constructed from the real name and the types of the arguments. So it's not really the same name.)

In C the names are different so the distinction is clear to the programmer, compiler and linker.

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But in actual function calls we do not do sqrtf() or sqrtl().. right? We just call sqrt() but argument to this can be float,double,long double. How is that achieved was my query. Maybe i did not use correct words. –  goldenmean Nov 4 '11 at 15:33

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