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I'm very new to Java. Eclipse is giving me the error

The method must return a result of type int

for the following code:

public class firstprog {
    public static int largest(int a, int b, int c) {
        if (a > b) {
            if (a > c) {
                return a;
            } else if (b > c) {
                return b;
            } else {
                return c;
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        int a = 7;
        int b = 8;
        int c = 9;

        System.out.println(largest(a, b, c));
    }
}

Why is this so?

share|improve this question
    
    
@Joachim that's not really a dupe. Anant didn't say what he named his file, but it can't have more than one class declared as shown. –  Jonathon Faust Nov 3 '11 at 14:37
    
I would just like to state that class-names in Java should always (it's a best practice) start with an uppercase character. –  Anders Nov 3 '11 at 14:37
    
As an exercise for the reader, there are trivial recursive/iterative versions that will handle any number of inputs. –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 3 '11 at 16:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes the problem is that you can only have one public class per file and this file should have the same name than the class. You can just remove the public in front of the definition of the first class. A better way to do would be to make it a static method of the main class.

To solve you second problem you can do this:

public class firstprog {


    public static int largest(int a,int b,int c) 
    {
        if(a>b)
        { 
            if(a>c)
                return a;
            else 
                if(b>c)
                    return b;
                else 
                    return c;
        }
        else
        {
            if(b>c)
                return b;
            else 
                return c;
        }
    }   

    public static  void main(String args[]) {

        int a=19;
        int b=2;
        int c=1;

        System.out.println(largest(a,b,c));  
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for that. I still get an error though, which is : this method must return a result of type int - here the method being talked about , is the method funk() –  Anant Nov 3 '11 at 14:36
    
Ok could you put your updated code so that we could help? –  lc2817 Nov 3 '11 at 14:38
    
@Anant: ask yourself: what does it return if a is not > b? A method must return a value in each possible path (except where it throws an exception). –  Joachim Sauer Nov 3 '11 at 14:39
    
@Ic2817: only one public top-level class per file. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 3 '11 at 14:40
    
@JoachimSauer Yes it should, i was basically testing out the syntax of my code –  Anant Nov 3 '11 at 14:41

Only one public top level class (a top level class is a class not contained in another class) is allowed per .java file.

Define funk in funk.java with no other top level classes.

Put any other top level classes in their own files where the file name matches the class name.

Regarding your second question, if you declare a method to return a particular type, like int, then all paths through that method must result in a return statement returning a valid value. In your example, the if statement might not be entered!

What happens if b == a or a < b?

share|improve this answer
    
In that case I don't see the purpose of defining it in a separate file. –  lc2817 Nov 3 '11 at 14:37
    
@lc2817 why is that? –  Hunter McMillen Nov 3 '11 at 14:40
    
@HunterMcMillen Why would you do so? Do you deem that it is a good practice? –  lc2817 Nov 3 '11 at 14:54
    
Separating classes into different files? Yes, I deem that good practice –  Hunter McMillen Nov 3 '11 at 15:02

Are you trying to put multiple classes into one file? Each class should get its own .java file with the appropriate name. Also make the first letter of your class upper case, as this is the naming convention.

As an aside, your function will only work if a is larger than c. You've missed out on some cases.

EDIT: you can have nested classes, but I think you might want to stay away from stuff like that for now.

share|improve this answer

In Java public classem must be in separate files with name the same as class name.

So put your funk class in funk.java file and firstprog class in firstprog.java file Or delete public in funk class, then this class will have default package modifier.

share|improve this answer

For your second error, the logic seems to be off a little... there is no return statement in the case where b > a.

share|improve this answer

Why is this so?

If you mean "why do I get this error", it's because you have not put the class in its own file, and you must. If you mean "why must I put the class in its own file", it's because Java says so: one public type (class or interface) per file.

Specifically, "its own" file must have the same name: the public class funk goes in funk.java, and the public class firstprog goes in firstprog.java.

share|improve this answer
public class firstprog {

    public static int largest(int a,int b,int c) 
    {

         if(a>b)
         { 
              if(a>c)
              {
                  return a;
              }
              else if(b>c)
              {
                  return b;
              }
              else
              {
                  return c;
              }
         }
         return 0;
    }   

    public static  void main(String args[]) {

        int a=7;
        int b=8;
        int c=9;

        System.out.println(largest(a,b,c));

    }
}

Note: you have to add return statement, because a is not greater then b, so it it not going inside of if block.. In your larget(...) it is expecting return statement as int.. so you have to add one more return statement. then it work ... Cheers ...!!!

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, he needs to add a return statement at the end. However, returning 0 is not the correct answer - especially if all of the inputs are greater than that... –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 3 '11 at 15:58

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