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I have an array of pointer to struct, and for any reasons when I print this array, there is a spare element at the end of it, and thus causes the code to print a NULL byte at the end.

Is there anyway I can delete the last chunk of memory?

For example:

typedef struct
{
    char *name;
} B;

typedef struct
{
    B *var;
} A;

int main() {
    int num = 5; //for example
    A *foo = malloc(sizeof(A));
    B *bar = malloc(num * sizeof(B));
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        bar[i] = *create_b(&bar[i]); // some function that works.
    }
    foo->var = bar;
    while (foo->var != NULL) {
        printf("This is %s\n",foo->var->name);
            foo->var++; 
    }
}

Everything is printed out just fine, but there's an unwanted printing at the end of the loop. Something like:

This is A
This is B
This is C
This is D
This is F
This is

Apparently the array only has 5 elements, the last one prints nothing.

share|improve this question
    
Check whether the array is null terminated or not if it is a char array as a member of struct. It is not supposed to print it. It's difficult to figure out unless you show us the code what you are actually trying. –  Mahesh Nov 3 '11 at 14:42
    
have you initialized the data in the array ? –  ziu Nov 3 '11 at 14:44
    
Can you show us an example of the code in question? Like how you define the array, the struct, and how you print the array? –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 3 '11 at 14:45
2  
Are you sure you are iterating over the right amount of elements that array of pointers has? –  Nicolás Nov 3 '11 at 14:46
    
I just added the code :) –  antiopengl Nov 3 '11 at 14:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your printing loop is:

foo->var = bar;
while (foo->var != NULL) {
    printf("This is %s\n",foo->var->name);
    foo->var++; 
}

But foo->var will never equal NULL, since you're just incrementing a pointer, so you will eventually read past the end of the bar array and your application will probably crash.

If you replace the while loop with for (int i = 0; i < num; i++), it will print the correct number of elements.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I'm looking for :) Thanks for the answer. –  antiopengl Nov 3 '11 at 15:05

You can't do foo->var++, because there is no place in the array that is set to NULL. Also, using that ++ changes foo->var so after the loop foo->var no longer points at the start of the array, and you can not access the array again.

You need to allocate memory for some end-of-array marker, just like strings has the character \0 to mark the end of the string.

Try the following:

int main() {
    int num = 5; //for example
    A *foo = malloc(sizeof(A));
    B *bar = malloc((num + 1) * sizeof(B));  // +1 for array terminator
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        bar[i] = *create_b(&bar[i]); // some function that works.
    }
    bar[i].name = NULL;  // Use this as a marker to mean end of array
    foo->var = bar;
    for (B *tmp = foo->var; tmp->name != NULL; tmp++) {
        printf("This is %s\n",tmp->name);
    }
}

Edit Had some errors in the code.

share|improve this answer

Your problem is probably in the function create_b, which you did not post.

Edit: no, that's probably wrong, sorry.

But surely this isn't what you want:

bar[i] = *create_b(&bar[i]);

You both pass in the address of bar[i] and set it equal to whatever the return value points to?

share|improve this answer
    
It only sets a name for 'bar', which prints out ok as you see. But the loop only goes from 0 to num? –  antiopengl Nov 3 '11 at 14:56
    
Yeah, I see that's not quite right -- see my edit? –  usul Nov 3 '11 at 14:59

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