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The code is here:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char* buf = malloc(3);
    strcpy(buf, "hi");
    printf("%s\n", buf);
    free(buf);
}

It's compiled with:

gcc a.c && valgrind ./a.out

The error message is here:

==1421== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==1421== Copyright (C) 2002-2010, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==1421== Using Valgrind-3.6.1 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==1421== Command: ./a.out
==1421== 
==1421== Invalid read of size 8
==1421==    at 0x4EA96C1: ??? (in /lib/libc-2.14.1.so)
==1421==    by 0x4E92D3B: puts (in /lib/libc-2.14.1.so)
==1421==    by 0x4005BB: main (in /home/peter/a.out)
==1421==  Address 0x51b4040 is 0 bytes inside a block of size 3 alloc'd
==1421==    at 0x4C2740D: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==1421==    by 0x400595: main (in /home/peter/a.out)
==1421== 
hi
==1421== 
==1421== HEAP SUMMARY:
==1421==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==1421==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 1 frees, 3 bytes allocated
==1421== 
==1421== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==1421== 
==1421== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==1421== ERROR SUMMARY: 2 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 6 from 6)

It is also very strange that valgrind reports no more errors if I use the following (just one more space):

printf("%s \n", buf);

Would anyone please help me?

share|improve this question
1  
1  
But I am using the g++ compiler and without the cast the error would be something like 'cannot convert from void* to char*'. I have some other reasons for why I am not using 'new' instead of 'malloc'. – peter Nov 3 '11 at 15:45
4  
You shouldn't build C code as C++, and then ask questions about it as if it were C. There are differences between C and C++. – unwind Nov 3 '11 at 15:48
1  
@unwind I was skeptical at first but I actually ran the code (compiled with gcc) and it does produce a warning, but only when using \n after %s. "Address 0x41b3028 is 0 bytes inside a block of size 3 alloc'd". – cnicutar Nov 3 '11 at 15:49
2  
I think you're getting bitten by puts (where gcc replaced a trivial printf) using an optimized strlen, which in this case is doing 8 byte reads, thus reading past the end of your allocated region. You may want to report this as a bug – Hasturkun Nov 3 '11 at 18:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a bug, but not reproducible on all machines.

On some machines, gcc optimizes simple printf() with, for example, puts(), which could possibly involve invalid read (or just valgrind thinks so).

If it really matters, you can 'complicate' the printf format. A space between %s and \n would do.

Here is a similar bug: C strings, strlen and Valgrind

This answer combines comments in the discussion. Thank you all!

share|improve this answer

I've run it in my own machine, and I get no errors:

==61755== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==61755== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==61755== Using Valgrind-3.5.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==61755== Command: ./a.out
==61755==
hi
==61755==
==61755== HEAP SUMMARY:
==61755==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==61755==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 1 frees, 3 bytes allocated
==61755==
==61755== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==61755==
==61755== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==61755== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 6 from 6)
share|improve this answer
    
So there's something wrong with my library or compiler? I'am using the gcc-multilib for x86_64, if it matters. – peter Nov 3 '11 at 15:49

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