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Basically, I have a couple Windows computers on my network that will be running a python script. A different set of configuration options should be used in the script depending on which computer is running this script.

How would I get that computer name in the python script?

Let's say the script was running on a computer named DARK-TOWER, I'd like to write something like this:

>>> python.library.getComputerName()
'DARK-TOWER'

Is there a standard or third party library I can use?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 53 down vote accepted

I know it's in poor taste to post an answer to your own question, but it turns out there are three options (including the two already answered earlier):

>>> import platform
>>> import socket
>>> import os
>>> platform.node()
'DARK-TOWER'
>>> socket.gethostname()
'DARK-TOWER'
>>> os.environ['COMPUTERNAME']
'DARK-TOWER'
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9  
Answering one's own question may be considered poor taste by some, but it is perfectly fine, as per the FAQ: stackoverflow.com/faq –  Stephan202 Apr 28 '09 at 21:02
2  
I don't think it's bad at all, since Eric was compiling a few different responses into a single resource, not to mention adding a new one (platform). –  nilamo Apr 28 '09 at 21:31
2  
ok, so this cries out for a follow-up: what's the difference between platform.node() and socket.gethostname() ? can they ever be different? –  Jason S Mar 11 '11 at 22:52
3  
On posix systems, socket.gethostname() returns the libc gethostname(), while platform.node() returns platform.uname()[1] which is somewhat related to os.uname() which calls the libc uname()... It looks like they might end up in the same place, but they take quite different paths to get there and I wouldn't be relying on the value to be the same across different platforms. –  Peter Gibson May 24 '12 at 8:17
    
On one side it wasn't one second answer, on the other side you got 3 to 4 perfectly acceptable answers before you did yours. –  Kobor42 Feb 16 at 11:49
import socket
socket.gethostname()
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1  
+1 for this being the best way to go. It's the most effective cross-platform call. –  joshin4colours Oct 15 '12 at 18:44

From http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-list/2006-April/552293.html

import os
os.getenv('COMPUTERNAME')
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3  
Thank you everyone for your answers. They all work fine, so I picked the person with the lowest rating. –  Eric Palakovich Carr Apr 28 '09 at 20:59
3  
This doesn't work for me on OS-X 10.6.8 using Python 2.7.2, it returns None. The other methods described do work however. –  Peter Gibson Aug 28 '11 at 11:16
1  
@PeterGibson I had the same thing occurring to me on Ubuntu 12.04. –  Daniel F. May 18 '12 at 12:27
2  
@EricPalakovichCarr, I would suggest removing this as the accepted answer due to not working on some platforms. –  Peter Gibson May 25 '12 at 3:22
1  
Good catch, guys. I've marked mine as the answer now. –  Eric Palakovich Carr May 25 '12 at 11:26

I bet gethostname will work beautifully.

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Promit from GameDev? Thanks for the answer :) –  Eric Palakovich Carr Apr 28 '09 at 21:02
1  
The very same. I got enough answers from SO that I thought I should contribute. –  Promit Apr 28 '09 at 22:21

Since the python scrips are for sure running on a windows system, you should use the Win32 API GetComputerName or GetComputerNameEx

You can get the fully qualified DNS name, or NETBIOS name, or a variety of different things.

import win32api
win32api.GetComputerName()

>>'MYNAME'

Or:

import win32api
WIN32_ComputerNameDnsHostname = 1 
win32api.GetComputerNameEx(WIN32_ComputerNameDnsHostname)

>> u'MYNAME'
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