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For the following problem I'm wondering if there is a known algorithm already as I don't want to reinvent the wheel.

In this case it's about hotel rooms, but I think that is rather irrelevant:

name   | max guests | min guests
1p     | 1          | 1
2p     | 2          | 2
3p     | 3          | 2
4p     | 4          | 3

I'm trying to distribute a certain amount of guests over available rooms, but the distribution has to satisfy the 'min guests' criteria of the rooms. Also, the rooms need to be used as efficiently as possible.

Let's take 7 guests for example. I wouldn't want this combination:

3 x 3p ( 1 x 3 guests, 2 x 2 guests )

.. this would satisfy the minimum criteria, but would be inefficient. Rather I'm looking for combinations such as:

1 x 3p and 1 x 4p
3 x 2p and 1 x 1p
etc...

I would think this is a familiar problem. Is there any known algorithm already to solve this problem?

To clarify:
By efficient I mean, distribute guests in such a way that rooms are filled up as much as possible (guests preferences are of secondary concern here, and are not important for the algorithm I'm looking for).
I do want all permutations that satisfy this efficiency criteria though. So in above example 7 x 1p would be fine as well.

So in summary:
Is there a known algorithm that is able to distribute items as efficiently as possible over slots with a min and max capacity, always satisfying the min criteria and trying to satisfy the max criteria as much as possible.

share|improve this question
    
"the rooms need to be used as efficiently as possible" it is not clear what your measure of efficeincy is. –  Raedwald Nov 3 '11 at 17:08
    
Should we assume that the guests come in groups (each group with a specific number of people) and that each room can only host a single group, like in a real hotel? –  han Nov 3 '11 at 17:10
1  
Your question is confusing. What do you mean by "efficient"? For example, why is 3x3p (3 rooms total) inefficient, but 3x2p + 1x1p (4 rooms total) efficient? It seems that the question is missing a cost or efficiency function. –  Andrew Schulman Nov 3 '11 at 17:11
    
@AndrewSchulman: please see my addition, for further clarification. –  Decent Dabbler Nov 3 '11 at 17:18
    
@han: no, the human aspect I not really relevant in this case. The most important thing for me is: how do I distribute items as efficiently as possible over slots with a min and max capacity, always satisfying the min criteria and trying to satisfy the max criteria where possible. –  Decent Dabbler Nov 3 '11 at 17:25

3 Answers 3

You need to use dynamic programming, define a cost function, and try to fit people in possible rooms having a cost function as small as possible.

Your cost function can be something like :

Sum of vacancy in rooms + number of rooms


It can be a bit similar to the least rageness problem : Word wrap to X lines instead of maximum width (Least raggedness)

You fit people in room, as you fit words in line.

The constraints are the vacancies in the rooms instead of being the length of the lines. (infinite cost if you don't fullfil the constraints)

and the recursion relation is pretty much the same .

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
$sql = "SELECT * 
FROM rooms 
WHERE min_guests <= [$num_of_guests]
ORDER BY max_guests DESC
LIMIT [$num_of_guests]";

$query = $this->db->query($sql);
$remaining_guests = $num_of_guests;
$rooms = array();
$filled= false;
foreach($query->result() as $row)
{
 if(!$filled)
 {
  $rooms[] = $row;
  $remaining_guests -= $row->max_guests;
  if(remaining_guests <= 0)
  {
   $filled = true;
   break;
  }
 }
}

Recursive function:

public function getRoomsForNumberOfGuests($number)
{
  $sql = "SELECT * 
  FROM rooms 
  WHERE min_guests <= $number
  ORDER BY max_guests DESC
  LIMIT 1";

  $query = $this->db->query($sql);
  $remaining_guests = $number;
  $rooms = array();
  foreach($query->result() as $row)
  {
    $rooms[] = $row;
    $remaining_guests -= $row->max_guests;
    if($remaining_guests > 0)
    {
     $rooms = array_merge($this->getRoomsForNumberOfGuests($remaining_guests), $rooms);
    }
  }
  return $rooms;
}

Would something like this work for ya? Not sure what language your in?

share|improve this answer
    
You could also, place this into a recursive function to get the most efficient results however, it would require multiple database calls? but if you limit the results to one result per query, getting the most efficient result based on the number of people left over? it wouldn't be to bad. –  anthony.c Nov 3 '11 at 17:47
    
Note: The code isn't tested and was just typed on the fly. No debug has been ran. Use provided code at your own risk. :) –  anthony.c Nov 3 '11 at 18:00

For efficint = minimum rooms used, perhaps this would work. To minimise the number of rooms used you want to put max guests in the large rooms.

So sort the rooms in descending order of max guests, then allocate guests to them in that order, placing max guests in each room in turn. Try to place all remaining guests is any remaining room that will accept that many min guests; if that is impossible, back-track and try again. When back tracking, hold back the room with the smallest min guests. Held back rooms are not allocated guests in the max guests phase.


EDIT

As Ricky Bobby pointed out, this does not work as such, because of the difficulty of the back-tracking. I'm keeping this answer for now, more as a warning than as a suggestion :-)

share|improve this answer
    
aha exact same answer at exact same time :D. But I don't think the backtracking is trivial. –  Ricky Bobby Nov 3 '11 at 17:37
    
As @Kevin noticed on my deleted answer it's not optimal : "(from @Kevin) I'm not certain about the smallest number assertion. What if you have rooms with capacities 13,8, and 1; and you want to accommodate 24 guests? The greedy algorithm allocates them as (13,8,1,1,1), but the real smallest solution is (8,8,8). " –  Ricky Bobby Nov 3 '11 at 17:40
1  
@Ricky Bobby: you should have kept your deleted answer, but edited to indicate the problem in that approach. I'll keep mine, but edited. –  Raedwald Nov 4 '11 at 10:32

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