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Is there a way to iterate over Java SparseArray (for Android) ? I used sparsearray to easily get values by index. I could not find one.

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13  
Wow, talk about a completely unloved class, conforms to ZERO collection interfaces... – user166390 Nov 3 '11 at 17:26
    
yeah, I know :( but is there an analogue for SparseArray ? – Ruzanna Nov 3 '11 at 17:29
    
You could use a TreeMap<Integer, MyType> which would allow you to iterate in order by key. As stated, SparseArray is designed to be more efficient than a HashMap, but it doesn't allow iteration. – John B Nov 3 '11 at 17:43
    
I just wanted to avoid TreeMap or HashMap because of there heaviness.Anyway, thank you all, for your suggestions. – Ruzanna Nov 4 '11 at 7:34
1  
it's very, very unlikely that the performance of the map impl you choose is going to be the bottleneck in your app. – Jeffrey Blattman Jul 9 '14 at 16:49
up vote 304 down vote accepted

Seems I found the solution. I hadn't properly noticed the keyAt(index) function.

So I'll go with something like this:

for(int i = 0; i < sparseArray.size(); i++) {
   int key = sparseArray.keyAt(i);
   // get the object by the key.
   Object obj = sparseArray.get(key);
}
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5  
Funny that we all missed this, presumably because we were looking for the usual collection interface methods... This is it though. – kabuko Nov 4 '11 at 17:45
23  
the documentation states that "keyAt(int index) Given an index in the range 0...size()-1, returns the key from the indexth key-value mapping that this SparseArray stores." so it works fine for me even for the case described by you. – Ruzanna Mar 3 '12 at 17:13
7  
it's better to precalculate size of array and use constant value in loop. – Dmitry Zaitsev Sep 6 '12 at 13:55
14  
Wouldnt it be easier to use directly valueAt function here? – Milan Krstic Feb 6 '13 at 23:25
16  
This would work too inside the loop: Object obj = sparseArray.valueAt(i); – Florian Feb 15 '13 at 17:01

If you don't care about the keys, then valueAt(int) can be used to while iterating through the sparse array to access the values directly.

for(int i = 0, nsize = sparseArray.size(); i < nsize; i++) {
    Object obj = sparseArray.valueAt(i);
}
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3  
Using valueAt() is useful (and faster than accepted solution) if your iteration doesn't care about the keys, ie: a loop counting occurrences of a specific value. – Sogger Mar 13 '13 at 19:30

Ooor you just create your own ListIterator:

public final class SparseArrayIterator<E> implements ListIterator<E> {

private final SparseArray<E> array;
private int cursor;
private boolean cursorNowhere;

/**
 * @param array
 *            to iterate over.
 * @return A ListIterator on the elements of the SparseArray. The elements
 *         are iterated in the same order as they occur in the SparseArray.
 *         {@link #nextIndex()} and {@link #previousIndex()} return a
 *         SparseArray key, not an index! To get the index, call
 *         {@link android.util.SparseArray#indexOfKey(int)}.
 */
public static <E> ListIterator<E> iterate(SparseArray<E> array) {
    return iterateAt(array, -1);
}

/**
 * @param array
 *            to iterate over.
 * @param key
 *            to start the iteration at. {@link android.util.SparseArray#indexOfKey(int)}
 *            < 0 results in the same call as {@link #iterate(android.util.SparseArray)}.
 * @return A ListIterator on the elements of the SparseArray. The elements
 *         are iterated in the same order as they occur in the SparseArray.
 *         {@link #nextIndex()} and {@link #previousIndex()} return a
 *         SparseArray key, not an index! To get the index, call
 *         {@link android.util.SparseArray#indexOfKey(int)}.
 */
public static <E> ListIterator<E> iterateAtKey(SparseArray<E> array, int key) {
    return iterateAt(array, array.indexOfKey(key));
}

/**
 * @param array
 *            to iterate over.
 * @param location
 *            to start the iteration at. Value < 0 results in the same call
 *            as {@link #iterate(android.util.SparseArray)}. Value >
 *            {@link android.util.SparseArray#size()} set to that size.
 * @return A ListIterator on the elements of the SparseArray. The elements
 *         are iterated in the same order as they occur in the SparseArray.
 *         {@link #nextIndex()} and {@link #previousIndex()} return a
 *         SparseArray key, not an index! To get the index, call
 *         {@link android.util.SparseArray#indexOfKey(int)}.
 */
public static <E> ListIterator<E> iterateAt(SparseArray<E> array, int location) {
    return new SparseArrayIterator<E>(array, location);
}

private SparseArrayIterator(SparseArray<E> array, int location) {
    this.array = array;
    if (location < 0) {
        cursor = -1;
        cursorNowhere = true;
    } else if (location < array.size()) {
        cursor = location;
        cursorNowhere = false;
    } else {
        cursor = array.size() - 1;
        cursorNowhere = true;
    }
}

@Override
public boolean hasNext() {
    return cursor < array.size() - 1;
}

@Override
public boolean hasPrevious() {
    return cursorNowhere && cursor >= 0 || cursor > 0;
}

@Override
public int nextIndex() {
    if (hasNext()) {
        return array.keyAt(cursor + 1);
    } else {
        throw new NoSuchElementException();
    }
}

@Override
public int previousIndex() {
    if (hasPrevious()) {
        if (cursorNowhere) {
            return array.keyAt(cursor);
        } else {
            return array.keyAt(cursor - 1);
        }
    } else {
        throw new NoSuchElementException();
    }
}

@Override
public E next() {
    if (hasNext()) {
        if (cursorNowhere) {
            cursorNowhere = false;
        }
        cursor++;
        return array.valueAt(cursor);
    } else {
        throw new NoSuchElementException();
    }
}

@Override
public E previous() {
    if (hasPrevious()) {
        if (cursorNowhere) {
            cursorNowhere = false;
        } else {
            cursor--;
        }
        return array.valueAt(cursor);
    } else {
        throw new NoSuchElementException();
    }
}

@Override
public void add(E object) {
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
}

@Override
public void remove() {
    if (!cursorNowhere) {
        array.remove(array.keyAt(cursor));
        cursorNowhere = true;
        cursor--;
    } else {
        throw new IllegalStateException();
    }
}

@Override
public void set(E object) {
    if (!cursorNowhere) {
        array.setValueAt(cursor, object);
    } else {
        throw new IllegalStateException();
    }
}
}
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Simple as Pie. Just make sure you fetch array size before actually perform the loop.

for(int i = 0, arraySize= mySparseArray.size(); i < arraySize; i++) {
   Object obj = mySparseArray.get(/* int key = */ mySparseArray.keyAt(i));
}

Hope this helps.

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For removing all the elements from SparseArray using the above looping leads to Exception.

To avoid this Follow the below code to remove all the elements from SparseArray using normal loops

private void getValues(){      
    for(int i=0; i<sparseArray.size(); i++){
          int key = sparseArray.keyAt(i);
          Log.d("Element at "+key, " is "+sparseArray.get(key));
          sparseArray.remove(key);
          i=-1;
    }
}
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The answer is no because SparseArray doesn't provide it. As pst put it, this thing doesn't provide any interfaces.

You could loop from 0 - size() and skip values that return null, but that is about it.

As I state in my comment, if you need to iterate use a Map instead of a SparseArray. For example, use a TreeMap which iterates in order by the key.

TreeMap<Integer, MyType>
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The accepted answer has some holes in it. The beauty of the SparseArray is that it allows gaps in the indeces. So, we could have two maps like so, in a SparseArray...

(0,true)
(250,true)

Notice the size here would be 2. If we iterate over size, we will only get values for the values mapped to index 0 and index 1. So the mapping with a key of 250 is not accessed.

for(int i = 0; i < sparseArray.size(); i++) {
   int key = sparseArray.keyAt(i);
   // get the object by the key.
   Object obj = sparseArray.get(key);
}

The best way to do this is to iterate over the size of your data set, then check those indeces with a get() on the array. Here is an example with an adapter where I am allowing batch delete of items.

for (int index = 0; index < mAdapter.getItemCount(); index++) {
     if (toDelete.get(index) == true) {
        long idOfItemToDelete = (allItems.get(index).getId());
        mDbManager.markItemForDeletion(idOfItemToDelete);
        }
    }

I think ideally the SparseArray family would have a getKeys() method, but alas it does not.

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4  
You're wrong - the keyAt method returns the value of the nth key (in your example keyAt(1) would return 250), not to be confused with get which returns the value of the element referenced by the key. – Eborbob Jun 19 '15 at 20:34
    
This is wrong, but I will leave it for science. – Tyler Pfaff Jan 29 at 2:17
    
I'm not sure what the 'this' is in your comment. Are you admitting that your answer is wrong, or are you saying that my comment is wrong? If the latter please check developer.android.com/reference/android/util/… – Eborbob Jan 29 at 10:00
3  
My answer is wrong, I will not delete it so that others can learn. – Tyler Pfaff Jan 29 at 16:58

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