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#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

void circle(int x, int y, int radius);
void line(int a, int b, int c, int d);
bool buffer[26][81];
char drawSpace[26][81];

int main() {
    int a = 0;
    int b = 0;
    int c = 0;
    int d = 0;
    int x = 0;
    int y = 0;
    int radius = 0;
    char choice;

    cout << "Type 'c' to draw a circle or type 'l' to draw a line." << endl;
    cin >> choice;

    if (choice == 'c'){
        cout << "please enter an x coordinate for the center of the circle \n";
        cin >> x;
        cout << "please enter a y coordinate for the center of the circle \n";
        cin >> y;
        cout << "please enter a value for the radius of the circle \n";
        cin >> radius;
        int moves = (x - radius) / 10;
        for (int s = 0; s < moves; s++){
            circle(x, y, radius);
            system("clear");
            x = x -10;
        }
    }

    else if (choice == 'l'){
        cout << "Please enter the x coordinate for the first point on the line \n";
        cin >> a;
        cout << "Please enter the y coordinate for the first point on the line \n";
        cin >> b;
        cout << "Please enter the x coordinate for the end point on the line \n";
        cin >> c;
        cout << "Please enter the y coordinate for the end point on the line \n";
        cin >> d;
    }

    else
        cout << "you did not enter an appropriate letter, please restart the program and try again."<< endl;

    return 0;
}

void circle(int x, int y, int radius){
    if (x + radius >= 81|| x - radius <= 0 || y + radius >= 26 || y - radius <= 0){
        cout << "the coordinates provided for the circle will not fit on the screen" << endl;
        return;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
        for(int j = 0; j < 81; j++) {
            int a = abs (x - j);
            int b = abs (y - i);
            int distance =  pow(a, 2) + pow(b, 2);
            int realDistance = pow(radius, 2);
            if (abs(realDistance - distance) <= 3){
                buffer[i][j] = true;
            }
        }
    }

    for (int m = 0; m < 26; m++){
        for(int n = 0; n < 81; n++){
            if (buffer[m][n]){
                drawSpace[m][n] = 42;
            }
            else
                drawSpace[m][n] = 32;
        }
    }

    for (int row = 25; row >= 0; row--) {
        for (int col = 0; col < 81; col++) {
            cout << drawSpace[row][col];
        }
        cout << "\n";
    }
}

void line(int a, int b, int c, int d){
    if (a >= 81 || c >= 81 || a <= 0 || c <= 0 || b >= 26 || d >= 26 || b <= 0 || d <= 0){
        return;
    }
    int intercept = 0;
    double rise = d - b;
    double run = c - a;
    double slope = rise/run;
    intercept = b - (slope*a);
    for (int i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
        for(int j = 21; j < 81; j++) {
            if (slope > 0){
                if (j > a && j < c){
                    int newIntercept = i - (slope*j);
                    int test = abs (intercept - newIntercept);
                    if (test <= 0)
                        buffer[i][j] = true;
                else
                    buffer[i][j] = false;
                }
            }
            else if (slope < 0){
                if (j < a && j > c){
                    int newIntercept = i - (slope*j);
                    int test = abs (newIntercept - intercept);
                    if (test <= 0)
                        buffer[i][j] = true;

                }
                else
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    for (int m = 0; m < 26; m++){
        for(int n = 0; n < 81; n++){
            if (buffer[m][n])
                drawSpace[m][n] = 42;
            else
                drawSpace[m][n] = 32;
        }
    }

    for (int row = 25; row >= 0; row--) {
        for (int col = 0; col < 81; col++) {
            cout << drawSpace[row][col];
        }
        cout << "\n";
    }
}

I have written this code for a programming assignment, the goal of which is to take inputs for the coordinates and dimensions of a circle or line, and to print them out to the terminal as if it were a graph. The second step is to get the shape to move from the right side of the screen to the left. I have started to write this code for the circle, however for some reason the system("clear") call does not seem to clear the screen, and it simply prints extra circles without getting rid of the older one. If someone could help I would really appreciate it.

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for system("cls") perhaps? regardless, you really, really shouldn't use things like that - although I imagine that because this is an assignment, that such things are expected. – Karl Knechtel Nov 3 '11 at 17:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The original poster doesn't have enough rep yet, so I'm posting this here for him:

I was actually a bit off base. The system("clear") I was using actually did work, the problem I was encountering was that I did not reset the bool array I was using to plot out the points that needed to be drawn. Thanks for the help, I learned a few things about how to clear the screen before I found my own problem.

share|improve this answer

Try:

cout << "\033[2J\033[1;1H";

Go http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_code for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
You can get this in-situ without magic constants with tput clear | hexdump -c or just read it in with a popen("tput clear") – Cuadue Mar 17 '14 at 19:08

On Linux (and other Unixes) you could also use the ncurses library to output to a terminal.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct answer. Everyone suggesting to use system() or to write to cout is just wrong. – Swiss Nov 3 '11 at 18:17
    
@Swiss What is so wrong about it if it is simply used for a small game or a homework assignment? – Nick Rolando Nov 3 '11 at 18:27
    
@Shredder system() is a terrible idea even for the simplest of projects, for both performance, security, and portability issues. Using cout to clear the terminal buffer is a bit better, but it's still a kludge to avoid using ncurses that offers no real benefit over just using ncurses. – Swiss Nov 3 '11 at 19:00
    
@Swiss: The use of ncurses adds a dependency that you might want to avoid so, no, it's not "just wrong". It depends on the situation, the world isn't just black or white. – user542603 Nov 4 '11 at 9:58
    
@Muu: ncurses is such a common library on the Unixes that avoiding it as a dependency is about on par with avoiding using the <math.h> library as a dependency. I could see this being true with Windows though. – Swiss Nov 4 '11 at 22:15

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