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I have a scenario where I'm trying to incorporate several people's PHP work, some of it OOP and some not. I want to pull a library file of functions into a class and have those functions be available to other files that reference the class. I know I can just call the library functions directly, but then I would have to update all of the dependent files to do likewise. Example:

class do_something {
  function test_state() {
    ...
  }

  if ($this->test_state($var)) {
    ...
  }
}

Where test_state() is identical to the same-named function in the library file, making for redundant code to keep sync'd. That can be changed to:

class do_something {
  if (test_state($var)) {
    ...
  }
}

But that creates the aforementioned problem of $this->test_state() not being available to files dependent on the class. What I'd like to be able to do is something like:

class do_something {
  public function test_state() = test_state();

  if ($this->test_state($var)) {
    ...
  }
}

Obviously, that's a very rough and incorrect example of what I'm trying to do... Is there any way in OOP to make that sort of reassignment, making the method of the same name as the function available within the class?

share|improve this question
    
So you want to take bad/unorganized code and half-refactor it so that it does what you want. What happens when the next "you" comes along and has to deal with that? Better to take the time to do it right. –  thetaiko Nov 3 '11 at 18:02
    
Well, when you put it that way... Actually, I only have control over a portion of the code, so my options are limited. –  overflowing Nov 3 '11 at 18:44

3 Answers 3

You can use a workaround to simulate this. In fact you would often want this approach to bolt on closures to objects in PHP. It leverages the magic __call method in PHP to redirect method calls to ordinary functions (beware: no $this available).

 class do_something {

     function __call($func, $args) {
         if (isset($this->$func) && is_callable($this->$func)) {
             return call_user_func_array($this->$func, $args);
         }
     }
 }

Then you can "register" functions that you want to allow (or closures) with a simple assignment:

 $do_something->function_name = "global_function_name";
 $do_something->or_even = array("other_class", "method");

But again, this doesn't make them proper methods as such.

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+1 This is a good generic approach that is a little easier to manage than the new method for each function approach that I described. You might consider putting the function definitions in a private $_libraryMethods array to isolate them from genuine class member variables. –  majelbstoat Nov 3 '11 at 18:45
    
This looks like the cleanest approach, but if I can't use $this, it doesn't really solve the problem of modifying dependent files that I don't have full control over. –  overflowing Nov 3 '11 at 19:01
    
To be clear, you can (and have to) use $this inside the class to access those functions. Assuming I understood the question correctly, this will do what you need. –  majelbstoat Nov 3 '11 at 19:44
    
You can use $this->bound_function() to invoke them. But the bound functions don't run in the object scope, thus cannot access $this-> attributes themselves. They remain ordinary external functions. –  mario Nov 3 '11 at 19:47

You'd create your base utility class, then extend it. See PHP's manual entry for inheritance for the details. I'm not saying this is the best solution for your exact situation, but I think it answers the question you were trying to get at.

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What you're asking for isn't possible directly, but can be faked with a quick (horrible) hack:

class do_something {
  public function test_state($param) {
    return test_state($param);
  }

...

  $this->test_state($param);
...

}

Good luck with refactoring!

share|improve this answer
    
It's not pretty, but it might do the trick. I only need to pull in a handful of functions. "Refactoring" ... that would have been useful to know in searching for an answer! –  overflowing Nov 3 '11 at 18:55

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