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I have a script that uses $(document).ready, but doesn't use anything else from jQuery. I'd like to lighten it up by removing the jQuery dependency.

How can I implement my own $(document).ready functionality without using jQuery? I know that using window.onload will not be the same, as window.onload fires after all images, frames etc have been loaded.

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8  
<body onload="yourFunc()"> is definitely the lightest ;) –  altCognito Apr 28 '09 at 22:32
162  
...and also definitely not the same functionality. –  Joel Mueller Jun 3 '09 at 19:39
17  
As this answer states, if all you want from jQuery is $(document).ready, you can solve that problem easily by running your code at the very bottom of the page instead of at the top. HTML5Boilerplate uses this exact approach. –  Blazemonger Jun 7 '13 at 14:59
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18 Answers

up vote 121 down vote accepted

It's much more complicated than just window.onload

jQuery Source:

function bindReady(){
    if ( readyBound ) return;
    readyBound = true;

    // Mozilla, Opera and webkit nightlies currently support this event
    if ( document.addEventListener ) {
    	// Use the handy event callback
    	document.addEventListener( "DOMContentLoaded", function(){
    		document.removeEventListener( "DOMContentLoaded", arguments.callee, false );
    		jQuery.ready();
    	}, false );

    // If IE event model is used
    } else if ( document.attachEvent ) {
    	// ensure firing before onload,
    	// maybe late but safe also for iframes
    	document.attachEvent("onreadystatechange", function(){
    		if ( document.readyState === "complete" ) {
    			document.detachEvent( "onreadystatechange", arguments.callee );
    			jQuery.ready();
    		}
    	});

    	// If IE and not an iframe
    	// continually check to see if the document is ready
    	if ( document.documentElement.doScroll && window == window.top ) (function(){
    		if ( jQuery.isReady ) return;

    		try {
    			// If IE is used, use the trick by Diego Perini
    			// http://javascript.nwbox.com/IEContentLoaded/
    			document.documentElement.doScroll("left");
    		} catch( error ) {
    			setTimeout( arguments.callee, 0 );
    			return;
    		}

    		// and execute any waiting functions
    		jQuery.ready();
    	})();
    }

    // A fallback to window.onload, that will always work
    jQuery.event.add( window, "load", jQuery.ready );
}
share|improve this answer
186  
Why in the world does this have 159 upvotes? It's just a copy and paste, without a link or version number, from some old version of the jQuery source. It's not even usable without copying more stuff from jQuery than is shown here, because it refers to multiple other jQuery properties and methods. This is a completely worthless answer. –  Mark Amery Sep 30 '13 at 17:01
18  
@MarkAmery the point was to show that jQuery's implementation of $(document).ready is not trivial to reproduce. Stack overflow is not here to re-implement document.ready for you –  Chad Grant Oct 2 '13 at 23:04
5  
@bitfed "these days" - the answer is five years old. –  Pekka 웃 Jan 19 at 18:07
9  
@bitfed I think I'm capable of understanding your comment the way it was intended, thank you. There is a discussion about this answer going on on Meta at the moment. Bottom line: it might not have passed for an answer these days - but it did in 2009. How relevant is your comment bitching about it? Short of having the OP unaccept the answer, and the author voluntarily delete it, there is not much we can do. –  Pekka 웃 Jan 19 at 19:18
5  
@bitfed The OP hasn't visited the site in over 3 years. Good luck. –  Mark Amery Jan 20 at 9:50
show 5 more comments

As The accepted answer was very far from complete, so I stitched together a "ready" function like jQuery.ready() based on jQuery 1.6.2 source

var ready = (function(){    

    var readyList,
        DOMContentLoaded,
        class2type = {};
        class2type["[object Boolean]"] = "boolean";
        class2type["[object Number]"] = "number";
        class2type["[object String]"] = "string";
        class2type["[object Function]"] = "function";
        class2type["[object Array]"] = "array";
        class2type["[object Date]"] = "date";
        class2type["[object RegExp]"] = "regexp";
        class2type["[object Object]"] = "object";

    var ReadyObj = {
        // Is the DOM ready to be used? Set to true once it occurs.
        isReady: false,
        // A counter to track how many items to wait for before
        // the ready event fires. See #6781
        readyWait: 1,
        // Hold (or release) the ready event
        holdReady: function( hold ) {
            if ( hold ) {
                ReadyObj.readyWait++;
            } else {
                ReadyObj.ready( true );
            }
        },
        // Handle when the DOM is ready
        ready: function( wait ) {
            // Either a released hold or an DOMready/load event and not yet ready
            if ( (wait === true && !--ReadyObj.readyWait) || (wait !== true && !ReadyObj.isReady) ) {
                // Make sure body exists, at least, in case IE gets a little overzealous (ticket #5443).
                if ( !document.body ) {
                    return setTimeout( ReadyObj.ready, 1 );
                }

                // Remember that the DOM is ready
                ReadyObj.isReady = true;
                // If a normal DOM Ready event fired, decrement, and wait if need be
                if ( wait !== true && --ReadyObj.readyWait > 0 ) {
                    return;
                }
                // If there are functions bound, to execute
                readyList.resolveWith( document, [ ReadyObj ] );

                // Trigger any bound ready events
                //if ( ReadyObj.fn.trigger ) {
                //  ReadyObj( document ).trigger( "ready" ).unbind( "ready" );
                //}
            }
        },
        bindReady: function() {
            if ( readyList ) {
                return;
            }
            readyList = ReadyObj._Deferred();

            // Catch cases where $(document).ready() is called after the
            // browser event has already occurred.
            if ( document.readyState === "complete" ) {
                // Handle it asynchronously to allow scripts the opportunity to delay ready
                return setTimeout( ReadyObj.ready, 1 );
            }

            // Mozilla, Opera and webkit nightlies currently support this event
            if ( document.addEventListener ) {
                // Use the handy event callback
                document.addEventListener( "DOMContentLoaded", DOMContentLoaded, false );
                // A fallback to window.onload, that will always work
                window.addEventListener( "load", ReadyObj.ready, false );

            // If IE event model is used
            } else if ( document.attachEvent ) {
                // ensure firing before onload,
                // maybe late but safe also for iframes
                document.attachEvent( "onreadystatechange", DOMContentLoaded );

                // A fallback to window.onload, that will always work
                window.attachEvent( "onload", ReadyObj.ready );

                // If IE and not a frame
                // continually check to see if the document is ready
                var toplevel = false;

                try {
                    toplevel = window.frameElement == null;
                } catch(e) {}

                if ( document.documentElement.doScroll && toplevel ) {
                    doScrollCheck();
                }
            }
        },
        _Deferred: function() {
            var // callbacks list
                callbacks = [],
                // stored [ context , args ]
                fired,
                // to avoid firing when already doing so
                firing,
                // flag to know if the deferred has been cancelled
                cancelled,
                // the deferred itself
                deferred  = {

                    // done( f1, f2, ...)
                    done: function() {
                        if ( !cancelled ) {
                            var args = arguments,
                                i,
                                length,
                                elem,
                                type,
                                _fired;
                            if ( fired ) {
                                _fired = fired;
                                fired = 0;
                            }
                            for ( i = 0, length = args.length; i < length; i++ ) {
                                elem = args[ i ];
                                type = ReadyObj.type( elem );
                                if ( type === "array" ) {
                                    deferred.done.apply( deferred, elem );
                                } else if ( type === "function" ) {
                                    callbacks.push( elem );
                                }
                            }
                            if ( _fired ) {
                                deferred.resolveWith( _fired[ 0 ], _fired[ 1 ] );
                            }
                        }
                        return this;
                    },

                    // resolve with given context and args
                    resolveWith: function( context, args ) {
                        if ( !cancelled && !fired && !firing ) {
                            // make sure args are available (#8421)
                            args = args || [];
                            firing = 1;
                            try {
                                while( callbacks[ 0 ] ) {
                                    callbacks.shift().apply( context, args );//shifts a callback, and applies it to document
                                }
                            }
                            finally {
                                fired = [ context, args ];
                                firing = 0;
                            }
                        }
                        return this;
                    },

                    // resolve with this as context and given arguments
                    resolve: function() {
                        deferred.resolveWith( this, arguments );
                        return this;
                    },

                    // Has this deferred been resolved?
                    isResolved: function() {
                        return !!( firing || fired );
                    },

                    // Cancel
                    cancel: function() {
                        cancelled = 1;
                        callbacks = [];
                        return this;
                    }
                };

            return deferred;
        },
        type: function( obj ) {
            return obj == null ?
                String( obj ) :
                class2type[ Object.prototype.toString.call(obj) ] || "object";
        }
    }
    // The DOM ready check for Internet Explorer
    function doScrollCheck() {
        if ( ReadyObj.isReady ) {
            return;
        }

        try {
            // If IE is used, use the trick by Diego Perini
            // http://javascript.nwbox.com/IEContentLoaded/
            document.documentElement.doScroll("left");
        } catch(e) {
            setTimeout( doScrollCheck, 1 );
            return;
        }

        // and execute any waiting functions
        ReadyObj.ready();
    }
    // Cleanup functions for the document ready method
    if ( document.addEventListener ) {
        DOMContentLoaded = function() {
            document.removeEventListener( "DOMContentLoaded", DOMContentLoaded, false );
            ReadyObj.ready();
        };

    } else if ( document.attachEvent ) {
        DOMContentLoaded = function() {
            // Make sure body exists, at least, in case IE gets a little overzealous (ticket #5443).
            if ( document.readyState === "complete" ) {
                document.detachEvent( "onreadystatechange", DOMContentLoaded );
                ReadyObj.ready();
            }
        };
    }
    function ready( fn ) {
        // Attach the listeners
        ReadyObj.bindReady();

        var type = ReadyObj.type( fn );

        // Add the callback
        readyList.done( fn );//readyList is result of _Deferred()
    }
    return ready;
})();

How to use:

<script>
ready(function(){
    alert('it works!');
});
ready(function(){
    alert('also works!');
});
</script>

I am not sure how functional this code is, but it worked fine with my superficial tests. This took quite a while, so I hope you and others can benefit from it.

p.s. I suggest compiling it

Edit: or you can use http://dustindiaz.com/smallest-domready-ever

function r(f){/in/(document.readyState)?setTimeout(r,9,f):f()}
r(function(){/*code to run*/});

or the native function if you only need to support the new browsers

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded',function(){/*fun code to run*/})
share|improve this answer
25  
Oh, God. I will think many times before removing jquery depedency next time. –  Johnny_D Oct 3 '13 at 12:15
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Poor man's solution:

    var checkLoad = function() {   
        document.readyState !== "complete" ? setTimeout(checkLoad,11) : alert("loaded!");   
    };  

checkLoad();  

http://jsfiddle.net/squadjot/s4EzY/

// Added this one, a bit better i guess, own scope, and non recursive

(function(){
    var tId = setInterval(function(){if(document.readyState == "complete") onComplete()},11);
    function onComplete(){
        clearInterval(tId);    
        alert("loaded!");    
        };
})()

http://jsfiddle.net/squadjot/XD7ZF/

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11  
I did it. It's out in the wild now. No going back. –  CalMlynarczyk Apr 8 '13 at 16:20
    
It might be worth limiting the recursions with an incrementing variable within the function. –  Philip Langford May 19 '13 at 11:25
2  
I don't understand why this man is poor. Maybe if lines of code equates to money. –  Alex W May 22 '13 at 17:38
6  
@PhilipLangford Or just put it inside of a setInterval and remove the recursion completely. –  Alex W May 22 '13 at 17:40
1  
@Raveren , hmm you're right, i'm pretty sure i tested it when i posted it. anyways, it only became even simpler, now the function just get called, no wrapping. –  Jakob Sternberg Dec 10 '13 at 3:42
show 6 more comments

three options:

  1. If script is the last tag of the body, DOM would be ready before script tag executes
  2. When DOM is ready, "readyState" will change to "complete"
  3. Put everything under 'DOMContentLoaded' event listener

onreadystatechange

  document.onreadystatechange = function () {
     if (document.readyState == "complete") {
     //document is ready. Do your stuff here
   }
 }

src: mdn

DOMContentLoaded

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', function(){
   console.log('document is ready. I can sleep now'); 
 });

concerned about stone age browsers: go to jquery source code and use ready function. in that case you are not parsing+executing the whole library, your are doing only very small part of it.

share|improve this answer
    
onreadystatechange cant be used in pre-html5, is it? –  midnite Dec 9 '13 at 5:27
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A standalone document.ready library - domready: https://github.com/ded/domready

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I was recently using this for a mobile site. This is John Resig's simplified version from "Pro JavaScript Techniques". It depends on addEvent.

var ready = ( function () {
  function ready( f ) {
    if( ready.done ) return f();

    if( ready.timer ) {
      ready.ready.push(f);
    } else {
      addEvent( window, "load", isDOMReady );
      ready.ready = [ f ];
      ready.timer = setInterval(isDOMReady, 13);
    }
  };

  function isDOMReady() {
    if( ready.done ) return false;

    if( document && document.getElementsByTagName && document.getElementById && document.body ) {
      clearInterval( ready.timer );
      ready.timer = null;
      for( var i = 0; i < ready.ready.length; i++ ) {
        ready.ready[i]();
      }
      ready.ready = null;
      ready.done = true;
    }
  }

  return ready;
})();
share|improve this answer
4  
Small omission for anyone cutting and pasting: comma in the addEvent parameter list. –  jontyc Jul 17 '11 at 9:19
    
@jontyc fixed. good eye –  AlienWebguy Nov 4 '11 at 1:29
8  
Be careful with this code. It's NOT equivalent to $(document).ready. This code triggers the callback when document.body is ready which doesn't guarantee the DOM is fully loaded. –  Karolis Nov 9 '11 at 14:24
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The jQuery answer was pretty useful to me. With a little refactory it fitted my needs well. I hope it helps anybody else.

function onReady ( callback ){
    var addListener = document.addEventListener || document.attachEvent,
        removeListener =  document.removeEventListener || document.detachEvent
        eventName = document.addEventListener ? "DOMContentLoaded" : "onreadystatechange"

    addListener.call(document, eventName, function(){
        removeListener( eventName, arguments.callee, false )
        callback()
    }, false )
}
share|improve this answer
    
on some browsers, the removeListener will need to be called with document as the context, ie. removeListener.call(document, ... –  Ron Mar 19 '13 at 3:44
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late to the game but I use this:

document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(event) { 
//Do work
});

Note: this probably only works with newer browsers

share|improve this answer
    
IE9 and above actually –  Pascalius Mar 29 at 21:04
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How about this solution?

// other onload attached earlier
window.onload=function() {
   alert('test');
};

tmpPreviousFunction=window.onload ? window.onload : null;

// our onload function
window.onload=function() {
   alert('another message');

   // execute previous one
   if (tmpPreviousFunction) tmpPreviousFunction();
};
share|improve this answer
2  
You could use addEventListener on window with "load". Listeners are executed one after one and dont need manually chaining. –  Zaffy Jan 9 '13 at 10:36
    
But load is different than ready. The 'load' even happens before the document is 'ready'. A ready document has its DOM loaded, a loaded window doesn't necessarily have the DOM ready. Good answer though –  Mzn Mar 30 '13 at 8:45
    
@Mzn: I think that's backwards. I think document ready happens before the window load event. "In general, it is not necessary to wait for all images to be fully loaded. If code can be executed earlier, it is usually best to place it in a handler sent to the .ready() method." (api.jquery.com/load-event) –  Tyler Rick Aug 23 '13 at 23:24
    
this will override rest of the window.onload events on the page and would cause issues. it should add event on top of existing one. –  Teoman shipahi Feb 19 at 23:08
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Just add this to the bottom of your html page...

> <script>
>    Your_Function();
> </script>
share|improve this answer
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It is worth looking here http://www.dustindiaz.com/rock-solid-addevent/ & here http://www.braksator.com/how-to-make-your-own-jquery

Here is the code in case the site goes down

function addEvent( obj, type, fn ) {
    if (obj.addEventListener) {
        obj.addEventListener( type, fn, false );
        EventCache.add(obj, type, fn);
    }
    else if (obj.attachEvent) {
        obj["e"+type+fn] = fn;
        obj[type+fn] = function() { obj["e"+type+fn]( window.event ); }
        obj.attachEvent( "on"+type, obj[type+fn] );
        EventCache.add(obj, type, fn);
    }
    else {
        obj["on"+type] = obj["e"+type+fn];
    }
}
var EventCache = function(){
    var listEvents = [];
    return {
        listEvents : listEvents,
        add : function(node, sEventName, fHandler){
            listEvents.push(arguments);
        },
        flush : function(){
            var i, item;
            for(i = listEvents.length - 1; i >= 0; i = i - 1){
                item = listEvents[i];
                if(item[0].removeEventListener){
                    item[0].removeEventListener(item[1], item[2], item[3]);
                };
                if(item[1].substring(0, 2) != "on"){
                    item[1] = "on" + item[1];
                };
                if(item[0].detachEvent){
                    item[0].detachEvent(item[1], item[2]);
                };
                item[0][item[1]] = null;
            };
        }
    };
}();
// Usage
addEvent(window,'unload',EventCache.flush);
addEvent(window,'load', function(){alert("I'm ready");});
share|improve this answer
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the ready function in jQuery does a number of things. Frankly, I don't see that point of replacing it unless you have amazingly small output from your website. jquery is a pretty tiny library, and it handles all sorts of cross-browser things you'll need later.

Anyway, there's little point in posting it here, just open up jquery and look at the bindReady method.

It starts by calling either document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded") or document.attachEvent('onreadystatechange') depending on the event model, and goes on from there.

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Cross-browser(old browsers too) and simple solution

var docLoaded = setInterval(function () {
    if(document.readyState === "complete") {
        clearInterval(docLoaded);
        /*
            Your code goes here i.e. init()
        */
    }
}, 100);

Showing alert in jsfiddle http://jsfiddle.net/FH749/

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This was a good http://stackoverflow.com/a/11810957/185565 poor man's solution. One comment considered a counter to bail out in case of emergency. This is my modification.

function doTheMagic(counter) {
  alert("It worked on " + counter);
}

// wait for document ready then call handler function
var checkLoad = function(counter) {
  counter++;
  if (document.readyState != "complete" && counter<1000) {
    var fn = function() { checkLoad(counter); };
    setTimeout(fn,10);
  } else doTheMagic(counter);
};
checkLoad(0);
share|improve this answer
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If you are loading jQuery near the bottom of BODY but having trouble with code that writes out jQuery( ) or jQuery(document).ready( ), check out jqShim on Github

https://github.com/withjam/jqshim-head

Rather than recreate its own document ready function, it simply holds onto the functions until jQuery is available then proceeds with jQuery as expected. The point of moving jQuery to the bottom of body is to speed up page load, and you can still accomplish it by inlining the jqShim.min.js in the head of your template.

I ended up writing this code to make moving all the scrips in Wordpress to the footer, and just this shim code now sits directly in the header. Seems to work so I shared it in case anyone else has this problem. Let me know if it works for you or if there are other issues it doesn't handle.

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If you want to support IE7+ (no quirks, compatibility and other pain), last chrome, last safari, last firefox and no iframes - this will be enough:

is_loaded = false
callbacks = []

loaded = ->
  is_loaded = true
  for i in [0...callbacks.length]
    callbacks[i].call document
  callbacks = []

content_loaded = ->
  document.removeEventListener "DOMContentLoaded", content_loaded, true
  loaded()

state_changed = ->
  if document.readyState is "complete"
    document.detachEvent "onreadystatechange", state_changed
    loaded()

if !!document.addEventListener
  document.addEventListener "DOMContentLoaded", content_loaded, true
else
  document.attachEvent "onreadystatechange", state_changed

dom_ready = (callback) ->
  if is_loaded
    callback.call document
  else
    callbacks.push callback
share|improve this answer
1  
That most definitely isn't javascript. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 20 at 13:07
    
Looks like someone writes CoffeeScript. –  Adrian Jan 21 at 17:32
add comment

Try this:

window.onload = function(){
    //Your js here
}
share|improve this answer
2  
"It's much more complicated than just window.onload." (stackoverflow.com/a/800010/825783) –  Eero Helenius Feb 18 '13 at 21:09
add comment

What about

setTimeout(function(){
    yourFunction();
},0);

It will wait until the document has rendered.

share|improve this answer
5  
Yes thats right –  Below the Radar Jul 15 '13 at 17:22
    
Why the downvotes on this answer? It appears to work just fine... –  Richiban Mar 11 at 11:22
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