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Why do Scalar-valued functions seem to cause queries to run cumulatively slower the more times in succession that they are used?

I have this table that was built with data purchased from a 3rd party.

I've trimmed out some stuff to make this post shorter... but just so you get the idea of how things are setup.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[GIS_Location](
        [ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL, --PK
        [Lat] [int] NOT NULL,
        [Lon] [int] NOT NULL,
        [Postal_Code] [varchar](7) NOT NULL,
        [State] [char](2) NOT NULL,
        [City] [varchar](30) NOT NULL,
        [Country] [char](3) NOT NULL,

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Address_Location](
    [ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL, --PK
    [Address_Type_ID] [int] NULL,
    [Location] [varchar](100) NOT NULL,
    [State] [char](2) NOT NULL,
    [City] [varchar](30) NOT NULL,
    [Postal_Code] [varchar](10) NOT NULL,
    [Postal_Extension] [varchar](10) NULL,
    [Country_Code] [varchar](10) NULL,

Then I have two functions that look up LAT and LON.

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[usf_GIS_GET_LAT]
(
    @City VARCHAR(30),
    @State CHAR(2)
)
RETURNS INT 
WITH EXECUTE AS CALLER
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @LAT INT

    SET @LAT = (SELECT TOP 1 LAT FROM GIS_Location WITH(NOLOCK) WHERE [State] = @State AND [City] = @City)

RETURN @LAT
END


CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[usf_GIS_GET_LON]
(
    @City VARCHAR(30),
    @State CHAR(2)
)
RETURNS INT 
WITH EXECUTE AS CALLER
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @LON INT

    SET @LON = (SELECT TOP 1 LON FROM GIS_Location WITH(NOLOCK) WHERE [State] = @State AND [City] = @City)

RETURN @LON
END

When I run the following...

SET STATISTICS TIME ON

SELECT
    dbo.usf_GIS_GET_LAT(City,[State]) AS Lat,
    dbo.usf_GIS_GET_LON(City,[State]) AS Lon
FROM
    Address_Location WITH(NOLOCK)
WHERE
    ID IN (SELECT TOP 100 ID FROM Address_Location WITH(NOLOCK) ORDER BY ID DESC)

SET STATISTICS TIME OFF

100 ~= 8 ms, 200 ~= 32 ms, 400 ~= 876 ms

--Edit Sorry I should have been more clear. I'm not looking to tune the query listed above. This is just a sample to show the execution time getting slower the more records it crunches through. In the real world application the functions are used as part of a where clause to build a radius around a city and state to include all records with in that region.

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3  
Let not sprinkle the NOLOCK hints on samples that do not need it in SO, the NOLOCK stuff really has nothing to do with this question. –  Sam Saffron Apr 29 '09 at 2:04
    
if you can't get rid of the functions in the "real query" then it will always be real slow. Give a better example, with the functions being used in the WHERE and we can give you ideas on that... –  KM. Apr 29 '09 at 15:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 18 down vote accepted

In most cases, it's best to avoid scalar valued functions that reference tables because (as others said) they are basically black boxes that need to be ran once for every row, and cannot be optimized by the query plan engine. Therefore, they tend to scale linearly even if the associated tables have indexes.

You may want to consider using an inline-table-valued function, since they are evaluated inline with the query, and can be optimized. You get the encapsulation you want, but the performance of pasting the expressions right in the select statement.

As a side effect of being inlined, they can't contain any procedural code (no declare @variable; set @variable = ..; return). However, they can return several rows and columns.

You could re-write your functions something like this:

create function usf_GIS_GET_LAT(
    @City varchar (30),
    @State char (2)
)
returns table
as return (
  select top 1 lat
  from GIS_Location with (nolock) 
  where [State] = @State
    and [City] = @City
);

GO

create function usf_GIS_GET_LON (
    @City varchar (30),
    @State char (2)
)
returns table
as return (
  select top 1 LON
  from GIS_Location with (nolock)
  where [State] = @State
    and [City] = @City
);

The syntax to use them is also a little different:

select
    Lat.Lat,
    Lon.Lon
from
    Address_Location with (nolock)
    cross apply dbo.usf_GIS_GET_LAT(City,[State]) AS Lat
    cross apply dbo.usf_GIS_GET_LON(City,[State]) AS Lon
WHERE
    ID IN (SELECT TOP 100 ID FROM Address_Location WITH(NOLOCK) ORDER BY ID DESC)
share|improve this answer

You can wrap your functionality in an inline TVF, that will be much faster:

http://sqlblog.com/blogs/alexander_kuznetsov/archive/2008/05/23/reuse-your-code-with-cross-apply.aspx

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you call the function two times (two select hits to the DB) for every row in the result set.

to make your query faster join right to GIS_Location and skip the functions:

SELECT
    g.Lat,
    g.Lon
FROM
    Address_Location        l WITH(NOLOCK)
    INNER JOIN GIS_Location g WITH(NOLOCK) WHERE l.State = g.State AND l.City = g.City
WHERE
    ID IN (SELECT TOP 100 ID FROM Address_Location WITH(NOLOCK) ORDER BY ID DESC)

I'm not sure why the NOLOCK, or the crazy where clause, I just copied from the question...

share|improve this answer
    
The data hardly changes so the nolock table hint reduces execution time as it dosn't have to issue the shared locks. The crazy where clause is just to sample x records so I could display it getting slower and slower the more records it crunched through. This is just a sample and not the real world application. In the real one I don't have the luxury of joining onto another table as the one I'm dealing with is a flag wide denormalized legacy table. –  DBAndrew Apr 28 '09 at 22:29
    
@DBAndrew, if you can't get rid of the functions in the "real query" then it will always be real slow. Give a better example, with the functions being used in the WHERE and we can give you ideas on that... –  KM. Apr 29 '09 at 13:09

They do not.

There is no bug in scalar functions that causes its performance to degrade exponentially depending on the number of rows in the scalar function is executed against. Try your tests again and have a look at SQL profiler, looking at the CPU and READS and DURATION columns. Increase you test size to include tests that take longer than a second, two seconds, five seconds.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.slow
(
    @ignore int
)
RETURNS INT 
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @slow INT
    SET @slow = (select count(*) from sysobjects a 
    	cross join sysobjects b 
    	cross join sysobjects c 
    	cross join sysobjects d 
    	cross join sysobjects e 
    	cross join sysobjects f
    where a.id = @ignore) 

    RETURN @slow
END
go
SET STATISTICS TIME ON

select top 1 dbo.slow(id)
from sysobjects
go
select top 5 dbo.slow(id)
from sysobjects
go
select top 10 dbo.slow(id)
from sysobjects
go
select top 20 dbo.slow(id)
from sysobjects
go
select top 40 dbo.slow(id)
from sysobjects

SET STATISTICS TIME OFF

Output

SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 203 ms,  elapsed time = 202 ms.


SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 889 ms,  elapsed time = 939 ms.

SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 1748 ms,  elapsed time = 1855 ms.

SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 3541 ms,  elapsed time = 3696 ms.


SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 7207 ms,  elapsed time = 7392 ms.

Keep in mind that if you are running a scalar function against rows in the result set, the scalar function will be executed per-row with no global optimisation.

share|improve this answer

Simply put, because SQL expressions with user defined functions are less efficient than SQL expressions without them. The execution logic can't be optimized; and the function overhead (including calling protocols) must be incurred for every row.

KMike's advice is good. WHERE .. IN (SELECT something) is not likely to be an efficient pattern, and in this case can be easily replaced with a JOIN.

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See if this works better... Or maybe a distinct inner join?

select a.*,
(select top 1 g.Lat from GIS_Location g where g.City = a.City and g.State = a.State) as Lat,
(select top 1 g.Lon from GIS_Location g where g.City = a.City and g.State = a.State) as Lon
from Address_Location a
where a.ID in (select top 100 ID from Address_Location order by ID desc)

As for the scalar function performance, I'm not sure.

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