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Given a vector of datetime values, I needed to create a data.frame containing datetimes at 0:10 hours past each original datetime - the first column 0 hours past, the second column 1 hour past, etc.

I had some trouble finding a way to do this easily using lubridate stuff. I thought this should work:

rt <- ymd_hms(c("2011-11-03 19:24:12", "2011-10-28 20:48:21",
  "2011-11-04 10:06:14", "2011-10-31 17:10:05", "2011-10-28 06:35:59"))
result <- outer(rt, hours(0:10), "+")

But various parts in that pipeline break down. Ultimately I get this error:

Error in FUN(X[[1L]], ...) : invalid 'times' argument

which seems to come from rep.POSIXct()'s or rep.period()'s inability to handle a non-unit-length times argument. Or something.

And it probably wouldn't have worked anyway, because outer() returns a matrix, and date objects, even POSIXct dates (which are internally just integers) it seems can't be elements in a matrix.

What I figured out that worked (just to get the times, not to put them in a data frame), after about 10 other guesses, was this:

with_tz(do.call(c, lapply(rt, function(x) x+hours(0:3))), tz(rt[1]))

The with_tz() addition is necessary because c() loses the timezone attribute. I also have to do do.call(c, lapply(...)) rather than just sapply(...) because sapply() loses the fact that it's a date.

Maybe another alternative would be to create a data frame by doing do.call(cbind, ...) or something.

In general, it would be great if, whenever we find R date/time tasks that seem conceptually easy but require a lot of gymnastics before finding a solution, we could remove the roadblocks by making changes to lubridate, or whatever. I'm thinking this might be one of those times. =)

share|improve this question
    
I think @hadley would be delighted if you submitted a patch to lubridate. You can submit an issue (and your patched code) here: github.com/hadley/lubridate/issues –  Andrie Nov 3 '11 at 20:46
    
I've actually done that for 2 other issues (see github.com/kenahoo/lubridate) over the past couple months, and @hadley was appreciative, but they aren't getting picked up. Lubridate hasn't had a commit since May, it seems like it might be in a development lull. –  Ken Williams Nov 3 '11 at 21:50
    
I think you should edit the title. You already admit that outer can't possibly return date time values. –  BondedDust Nov 4 '11 at 0:09
    
@DWin - done, thanks. –  Ken Williams Nov 5 '11 at 3:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This doesn't use outer(), but I think it gets you where you want. It does use plyr.

library("lubridate")
library("plyr")

rt <- ymd_hms(c("2011-11-03 19:24:12", "2011-10-28 20:48:21",
  "2011-11-04 10:06:14", "2011-10-31 17:10:05", "2011-10-28 06:35:59"))

offsets = 0:10
names(offsets) <- offsets

dat <- data.frame(llply(offsets, function(offset){rt+hours(offset)}))

Giving names to the offsets variable just makes the column names of the data.frame nicer.

> str(dat)
'data.frame':   5 obs. of  11 variables:
 $ X0 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 19:24:12" "2011-10-28 20:48:21" ...
 $ X1 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 20:24:12" "2011-10-28 21:48:21" ...
 $ X2 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 21:24:12" "2011-10-28 22:48:21" ...
 $ X3 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 22:24:12" "2011-10-28 23:48:21" ...
 $ X4 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 23:24:12" "2011-10-29 00:48:21" ...
 $ X5 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-04 00:24:12" "2011-10-29 01:48:21" ...
 $ X6 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-04 01:24:12" "2011-10-29 02:48:21" ...
 $ X7 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-04 02:24:12" "2011-10-29 03:48:21" ...
 $ X8 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-04 03:24:12" "2011-10-29 04:48:21" ...
 $ X9 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-04 04:24:12" "2011-10-29 05:48:21" ...
 $ X10: POSIXct, format: "2011-11-04 05:24:12" "2011-10-29 06:48:21" ...

UPDATE:

Ken's comment about ldply() versus data.frame(llply()) made me realize there is another way to approach this.

dat <- ldply(rt, `+`, hours(0:10))

which gives

> str(dat)
'data.frame':   5 obs. of  11 variables:
 $ V1 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 12:24:12" "2011-10-28 13:48:21" ...
 $ V2 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 13:24:12" "2011-10-28 14:48:21" ...
 $ V3 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 14:24:12" "2011-10-28 15:48:21" ...
 $ V4 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 15:24:12" "2011-10-28 16:48:21" ...
 $ V5 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 16:24:12" "2011-10-28 17:48:21" ...
 $ V6 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 17:24:12" "2011-10-28 18:48:21" ...
 $ V7 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 18:24:12" "2011-10-28 19:48:21" ...
 $ V8 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 19:24:12" "2011-10-28 20:48:21" ...
 $ V9 : POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 20:24:12" "2011-10-28 21:48:21" ...
 $ V10: POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 21:24:12" "2011-10-28 22:48:21" ...
 $ V11: POSIXct, format: "2011-11-03 22:24:12" "2011-10-28 23:48:21" ...

Note that, in addition to different column names (V1-V11 rather than X0-X10), these dates have been converted to local time (PDT, in my case):

> dat$V1
[1] "2011-11-03 12:24:12 PDT" "2011-10-28 13:48:21 PDT"
[3] "2011-11-04 03:06:14 PDT" "2011-10-31 10:10:05 PDT"
[5] "2011-10-27 23:35:59 PDT"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that works. Am I correct that the reason you do data.frame(llply(...)) rather than just ldply(...) is to recombine by column, rather than row? It might be nice if ldply (and other *dply functions) had an argument indicating direction of join. –  Ken Williams Nov 3 '11 at 21:56
    
@KenWilliams, that's correct. ldply would combine the results of the function call (here, adding hours to the rt vector) as rows, where returning them as lists and then calling data.frame makes each list a column. Your comment does point out another way to do it, though, by iterating the other way. I'll add it to the answer. –  Brian Diggs Nov 3 '11 at 22:41
    
Nice idea! I'd never thought of using l*ply like that for an outer product. –  Ken Williams Nov 4 '11 at 2:38

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