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I have following typedef defined and *ButtonSettingPtr as a pointer:

 typedef struct
    {
      void     *next;
      char**   buttonsetting;
      char*    currentsetting;
      uint16_t presetid;
      uint16_t currentcounter;
      uint16_t maxsize;
      uint16_t buttonid;
    } ButtonSetting;

typedef ButtonSetting *ButtonSettingPtr;


class Options {
 private:
  ButtonSettingPtr settings;
  ButtonSettingPtr preset1;
public:
Options();
void newSetting(char** _setting, uint16_t _maxsize, uint16_t _buttonid);
// some other stuff defined here
}

With the newSetting() function I am adding several new entries to my typedef instance! Now, I would like to save all these settings (this->settings) into another pointer (this->preset1) via memcpy to later call them up again via another function, since I am using this->settings in a couple of other functions (getCurrentSetting) which are working quite well etc.

char *Options::getCurrentSetting(uint16_t _buttonid) {
  ButtonSettingPtr setting = (ButtonSettingPtr)this->settings;
  while (setting != NULL)
  {
    if (setting->buttonid == _buttonid) {
      char * tmpsetting = 
        setting->buttonsetting[setting->currentcounter];
      return tmpsetting;

    }
    setting = (ButtonSettingPtr)setting->next;
  }
  return NULL;
}

Here's the problem:

void Options::savePreset() {
  memcpy(&this->preset1,&this->settings,sizeof(&this->settings));
}
void Options::loadPreset() {
  memcpy(&this->settings,&this->preset1,sizeof(&this->preset1));
}

It seems that my preset1 pointer is always exactly the same as this->settings even though i am changing settings inbetween. I understand that with the &amp sign it literally copies the address of that pointer, so to no surprise they will both always be exactly the same. But what I would like to copy is rather all bytes and point them to preset1, so I can recall all the settings later again.

So, without the &amp sign my code just hangs:

void Options::savePreset() {
  memcpy(this->preset1,this->settings,sizeof(this->settings));
}
void Options::loadPreset() {
  memcpy(this->settings,this->preset1,sizeof(this->preset1));
}

Do I have to malloc the this->preset1 pointer before I memcpy everything to it? The whole code is compiled using avr-libc for an atmega chip.

Thanks in advance for any useful hint!

ps: My understanding of C++ has been surely better when I was younger!

share|improve this question
1  
Pardon my saying, but that code looks horrific. What gave you the idea to use pointers? Or typedef your classes? Are you sure you're not remembering a different language from when you were younger? –  Kerrek SB Nov 3 '11 at 19:15
    
@KerrekSB: Heh... :P –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 3 '11 at 19:16
2  
The only C++ I see in this code is the class keyword... –  Ed S. Nov 3 '11 at 19:17
    
We aren't given the Options constructor to know how they were initialized. I would recommend trying to reduce the problem down, this is too much information. At a glance, sizeof(this->settings) is suspicious. Consider revising this to use a copy constructor instead of memcpy. –  Tom Kerr Nov 3 '11 at 19:24

3 Answers 3

sizeof(&this->settings)

will return the size of a pointer because it is effectively a pointer.

sizeof(this->settings)

will return the size of a pointer because it is a pointer.

sizeof(*this->settings)

will return the size of the anonymous struct that settings points too.

And as for the question of needing to malloc space for

 this->preset1

depends on you code. But it for sure needs to point to valid memory!

share|improve this answer

Yes, you do need to malloc preset1 (no need to dereference it with this-> inside a member function. If you want to make it clear that it's a class data member, name it m_preset1 or mPreset1 as you like).

So, in your constructor set preset1 to NULL. Then in your member function you can:

void Options::savePreset() {
    if (preset1 == NULL) {
        preset1 = (ButtonSettingPtr)malloc(sizeof (ButtonSetting));
    }
    memcpy(preset1, settings, sizeof(ButtonSetting));
}

Don't forget to add error checking. But really, I don't see any reason not to statically allocate space instead and avoid memory allocation issues:

class Options {
private:
    ButtonSetting settings;
    ButtonSetting preset1;
public:
    Options();
    void newSetting(char** _setting, uint16_t _maxsize, uint16_t _buttonid);
    // some other stuff defined here
}

void Options::savePreset() {
    memcpy(&preset1, &settings, sizeof(ButtonSetting));
}

Note that sizeof(this->settings) will always be 4 or 8 (depending on 32 or 64 bit CPU) because you're asking for the size of a pointer, not the size of the structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, I know malloc() is not C++; I was just using the convention in the OP's question. –  JoeFish Nov 3 '11 at 19:27

It looks like you're doing a home-grown singly linked list. If you replace that with std::vector you'll find that copying one to the other is as easy as preset1 = settings; (you don't need to put this-> in front of everything unless you just prefer that style).

You might also want to replace the char** inside the class with std::vector<string> as well, then the actual strings will be copied.

share|improve this answer
    
It's an embedded system. Im using the avr-gcc compiler so I cant use the neat C++ features (std::vector) –  Fresco Gamba Nov 3 '11 at 19:53
    
@FrescoGamba, a compiler that doesn't implement vector doesn't deserve to be called C++. Sorry to waste your time. –  Mark Ransom Nov 3 '11 at 19:58
    
So, it seems that it copies only the first entry of the linked list if I do this: memcpy(preset1, settings, sizeof(ButtonSetting)); and for loading the preset memcpy(settings, preset1, sizeof(ButtonSetting)); –  Fresco Gamba Nov 12 '11 at 18:31
    
hence, I would to copy every element of my linked list? again I am struggling with the syntax! –  Fresco Gamba Nov 12 '11 at 18:36

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