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I'm working on a ticketing system where analysts will be assigned tickets based on a specific criteria.

When they first log in they will click on the Get Net Ticket button.

The tickets are assigned as follows:

  1. First: Open (oldest ticket with status of Open)
  2. Second:Pending (any tickets with Pending status when pend date = today)
  3. Third: Ready (oldest, new (unassigned) ticket)

So if they click Get Next it will look for oldest open, if none > select Pending today, if none > select oldest Ready.

Below is my query but it doesnt seem to be working reliably. Any suggestions?

    SELECT * 
    FROM support_case
    WHERE (
    case_status = 'Pending'
    AND case_queue = 'Software'
    AND pendDate = '12/15/2011')
    OR (
    case_status = 'Open'
    AND case_queue = 'Software')
    OR (
    case_status = 'Ready'
    AND case_queue = 'Software')
    ORDER BY lastUpdate ASC 
    LIMIT 0 , 1
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What do you mean with not reliably? The query does not follow your 'first-second-third' business rule? How should it, with the ORDER BY lastUpdate ASC? –  Konerak Nov 3 '11 at 20:12
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1 Answer 1

This will sort them by support_case, then by oldest open.

Open will be sorted oldest->newest, followed by Pending sorted oldest->newest, then Ready sorted oldest->newest.

SELECT * 
FROM support_case
WHERE ( 
case_status = 'Pending' 
OR case_status = 'Open' 
OR case_status = 'Ready' )
AND case_queue = 'Software'
ORDER BY support_case ASC, lastUpdate ASC
LIMIT 1

If you had different status values (that weren't nicely alphabetical), you could restructure your database, or add a new column, to give a numerical value to your case_status. Then you can add an ORDER BY case_status_value DESC to your query.

So: 'Open' = 10 'Pending' = 5 'Ready' = 1

So that Open are returned first, then pending, then ready. Then you can query:

SELECT * 
FROM support_case
WHERE ( 
case_status = 'Pending' 
OR case_status = 'Open' 
OR case_status = 'Ready' )
AND case_queue = 'Software'
ORDER BY case_status_value DESC,
lastUpdate ASC
LIMIT 1

See @konerak's comments below for another option that accomplishes the same, without the column structure changes.

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1  
Adding a value could work. But here, you can also ORDER ON the case_status, since in this specific case, it appears the desired order equals the alphabetic order :) –  Konerak Nov 3 '11 at 20:13
    
@Konerak Nice, I guess I need to learn my alphabet... here I thought Pending was going to throw it for a loop ;) –  Set Sail Media Nov 3 '11 at 20:16
1  
Feel free to add that into your answer - and your 'add a value solution' would be the more generic case. There is a shortcut, still: instead of adding a column, one could just ORDER BY CASE case_status WHEN 'Open' THEN 3 WHEN 'Pending' THEN 2 WHEN 'Ready' THEN 1. Saves adding a column, but moves the logic to the query. Each approach has advantages. –  Konerak Nov 3 '11 at 20:19
    
I did not know about CASE logic. Thanks! –  Set Sail Media Nov 3 '11 at 20:39
    
thanks for the feedback...only thing missing is that if a case is open or ready it wont have a pend date. ie: if we do a get next, the first in the order of operations is "Pending". If a case has a pending status, we check to see if the pending date = today. if the pending date is <> today we go to the next criteria - Open (no pending date - just status and queue). If no tickets are "Open", we move to "Ready", etc. –  user1028445 Nov 11 '11 at 16:59
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