Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following script

#!/bin/sh
if [cat stream_should_be_running.txt == 'true']; then #file will either contain true or false
    if [ps ax|grep -v grep|grep tracker_stream]; then # check if stream is currently running
        exit 0
    else
        /usr/local/bin/python2.7 ~/webapps/dashboard/fbadmin/manage.py tracker_stream; # restart stream
        exit 0
else
    exit 0
fi

This script should check if a daemon script is suppose to be running. If it is suppose to be running then it checks to see if the script is running and restarts it if it isn't. Currently I get syntax error: unexpected end of file when I try to running the file manually.

So two questions:

  1. why am i pulling the syntax error
  2. outside of this should this script run properly?

Thanks


EDIT: here is an updated version of the script and a few notes:

#!/bin/sh
set -vx; # turn on shell debugging

if [[ "$(cat stream_should_be_running.txt)" == "true" ]]; then
    if [ ps ax|grep -v grep|grep -q tracker_stream ]; then
        exit 0
    else
        /usr/local/bin/python2.7 ~/webapps/dashboard/fbadmin/manage.py tracker_stream;
        exit 0
    fi
else
    exit 0
fi

to note:

  • vim marks $(...) as a syntax error ( i don't know if that matters)
  • ps ax|grep -v grep|grep -q tracker_stream , ps ax|grep -v grep|grep tracker_stream , and cat stream_should_be_running.txt all execute properly from the command line

EDIT 2: shell debugging gives the error

$ sh stream_checker.sh

+ $'\r'
: command not foundline 3: 
if [[ "$(cat stream_should_be_running.txt)" == "true" ]]; then 
    echo 'test';
    if [ ps ax|grep -v grep|grep -q tracker_stream ]; then 
        exit 0
    else
    /usr/local/bin/python2.7 ~/webapps/dashboard/fbadmin/manage.py tracker_stream;
    exit 0
    fi
else
    exit 0
fi

stream_checker.sh: line 15: syntax error: unexpected end of file

so the only things that come before where the + $'\r' is returns are #!/bin/sh and set -vx.

This is running on a linux system. The my local machine is osx lion and the live machine is a linux server on webfaction.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you just record the pid in the file instead and do a kill -0 pid and verify the return code, zero it's running non-zero it's not running. –  Anders Nov 3 '11 at 20:58
    
The user can set whether tracker_stream should be running. This action is what changes the value in stream_should_be_running.txt from false to true. The rest of the script that I've shown just maintains tracker_stream as a daemon when it is active. –  Daniel Nill Nov 3 '11 at 21:03
    
Try running with ./sh -x script.sh –  pmod Nov 3 '11 at 21:14
    
using sh -x script.sh doesn't seem to change anything... –  Daniel Nill Nov 3 '11 at 21:17
    
Well, it shouldn't, but what does it show? –  pmod Nov 3 '11 at 21:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1) I think I got it...

I used the '-s' switch in pidof to only get one result.
The '-z' switch means "return true if the string is empty".

#!/bin/sh
PID=$(pidof -s tracker_stream);
if [ $(cat stream_should_be_running.txt) = "true"]; then #file will either contain true or false
    if [ -z $PID ]; then # check if stream is currently NOT running
        /usr/local/bin/python2.7 ~/webapps/dashboard/fbadmin/manage.py tracker_stream; # restart stream
        exit 0;
    fi
fi

EDIT: From the last note you posted it looks like you might have a Ctrl-M char (^M), somewhere on your file.
It's not merely a ^ followed by a M, it's a end of line character.

You could open your file with vim -b to check if you see any of those characters. Then type:

:%s/^V^M//g 

That command reads like "match all (^M) chars and substitute them with void".
In short it will remove all (^M) chars from your file.
The (^V^M) bit means that you have to hit CTRL-V CTRL-M, in order to insert the (^M) char.

2) what exactly do you mean by "outside of this"?

share|improve this answer
    
it still gives the same syntax error with the added fi –  Daniel Nill Nov 3 '11 at 20:55
    
as to your question. I'm not that familiar with shell scripting and so I am not sure what other parts of this code might throw an error. My main concern is whether you can use cat to return true or false from the file and have the if block terminate based on that. –  Daniel Nill Nov 3 '11 at 20:59
    
I have checked and yes, you can do something like: if[ $(cat a.txt) = "true" ]; (And it will return if your file as "false" instead for example) –  Rcosta Nov 3 '11 at 21:09
    
You could also just create that file, leave it empty, and just test if the file existed with the '-f' switch: [ -f stream.txt ] You would need to remove it later though... –  Rcosta Nov 3 '11 at 21:33
    
unfortunately pidof does not exist on the unix system I'm running this on. Anyways tracker_stream is a django manage command so using ps is pretty much the only way to look up the pid. –  Daniel Nill Nov 3 '11 at 21:38

your square brackets need spaces around them, i.e.

if [ ps ax|grep -v grep|grep tracker_stream ] ;

AND more importantly, you need to use command substitution so your script can get the value inside stream_should_be_running.txt using $( cat ... ), i.e.

if [[ "$(cat stream_should_be_running.txt)" == 'true' ]] ; then 
    #file will either contain true or false
    if[ ps ax|grep -v grep|grep -q tracker_stream ] ; then 
        # check if stream is currently running
        exit 0
    else
        /usr/local/bin/python2.7 ~/webapps/dashboard/fbadmin/manage.py tracker_stream; 
        # restart stream
        exit 0
else
    exit 0
fi

Also better to dbl-quote the value returned by $(cat ...) in case some how there are spaces in the file.

Finally, turn on shell debugging by adding set -vx near top script. Then you can each line/block of code as it being executed, AND the values that are substituted for variables.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I'm definitely looking for pointers like this, but this doesn't solve the syntax error. –  Daniel Nill Nov 3 '11 at 20:57
    
Doah, missed some crucial stuff in your code, note edits above. –  shellter Nov 3 '11 at 21:21
    
Final edits done. –  shellter Nov 3 '11 at 21:24
    
I have a feeling we are slowly getting closer, but this didn't seem to solve the syntax error –  Daniel Nill Nov 3 '11 at 21:25
    
Note the addition of -q to your last grep in the 2nd if. Test that line seperately, if you get error message, remove -q and put >/dev/null 2>&1 at the end of the line. If turn on set -vx, edit your message to show the debugging info just before the error message. Good luck. –  shellter Nov 3 '11 at 21:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.