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I have the following model in MVC:

public class ParentModel
{
    public string Property1 { get; set; }
    public string Property2 { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<ChildModel> Children { get; set; }
}

When I want to display all of the children for the parent model I can do:

@Html.DisplayFor(m => m.Children)

I can then create a ChildModel.cshtml display template and the DisplayFor will automatically iterate over the list.

What if I want to create a custom template for IEnumerable?

@model IEnumerable<ChildModel>

<table>
    <tr>
        <th>Property 1</th>
        <th>Property 2</th>
    </tr>
    ...
</table>

How can I create a Display Template that has a model type of IEnumerable and then call @Html.DisplayFor(m => m.Children) without it complaining about the model type being wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Like this:

@Html.DisplayFor(m => m.Children, "YourTemplateName")

or like this:

[UIHint("YourTemplateName")]
public IEnumerable<ChildModel> Children { get; set; }

where obviously you would have ~/Views/Shared/DisplayTemplates/YourTemplateName.cshtml:

@model IEnumerable<ChildModel>

<table>
    <tr>
        <th>Property 1</th>
        <th>Property 2</th>
    </tr>
    ...
</table>
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Is there really no way to declare a template that would auto hook up as the default for any IEnumerable? –  Maslow Feb 6 '13 at 15:29
    
You could use the object.cshtml template for that. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 6 '13 at 15:57
3  
I don't believe this answer is 100% correct.. 1) If DisplayFor is called with the template name, it will not automatically iterate over collection; 2) Specifying @model ICollection in display template will not allow accessing ChildModel properties without retrieving an item from collection i.e. foreach needs to be used –  Jack0fshad0ws Sep 8 '13 at 22:30
1  
@Jack0fshad0ws, you are absolutely right. And that's the reason why in my answer I used @model IEnumerable<ChildModel> in the template. Because when you specify a template name, the model that is passed to the template is the collection property. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 9 '13 at 6:01
1  
Am I understanding correctly that there is no way to (a) avoid foreach AND (b) specify the name of a template? In the example above, I would still need to @foreach through the table rows. –  Marc Stober Feb 12 at 16:42

This is in reply to Maslow's comment. This is my first ever contribution to SO, so I don't have enough reputation to comment - hence the reply as an answer.

You can set the 'TemplateHint' property in the ModelMetadataProvider. This would auto hookup any IEnumerable to a template you specify. I just tried it in my project. Code below -

protected override CachedDataAnnotationsModelMetadata CreateMetadataFromPrototype(CachedDataAnnotationsModelMetadata prototype, Func<object> modelAccessor)
    {
        var metaData = base.CreateMetadataFromPrototype(prototype, modelAccessor);
        var type = metaData.ModelType;

        if (type.IsEnum)
        {
            metaData.TemplateHint = "Enum";
        }
        else if (type.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(IEnumerable<object>)))
        {
            metaData.TemplateHint = "Collection";
        }

        return metaData;
    }

You basically override the 'CreateMetadataFromPrototype' method of the 'CachedDataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider' and register your derived type as the preferred ModelMetadataProvider.

In your template, you cannot directly access the ModelMetadata of the elements in your collection. I used the following code to access the ModelMetadata for the elements in my collection -

@model IEnumerable<object>
@{ 
var modelType = Model.GetType().GenericTypeArguments[0];
var modelMetaData = ModelMetadataProviders.Current.GetMetadataForType(null, modelType.UnderlyingSystemType);

var propertiesToShow = modelMetaData.Properties.Where(p => p.ShowForDisplay);
var propertiesOfModel = modelType.GetProperties();

var tableData = propertiesOfModel.Zip(propertiesToShow, (columnName, columnValue) => new { columnName.Name, columnValue.PropertyName });
}

In my view, I simply call @Html.DisplayForModel() and the template gets loaded. There is no need to specify 'UIHint' on models.

I hope this was of some value.

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In my question about not getting output from views, I actually have an example of how to template a model with a collection of child models and have them all render.

ASP.NET Display Templates - No output

Essentially, you need to create a model that subclasses List<T> or Collection<T> and use this:

@model ChildModelCollection 

@foreach (var child in Model)
{
    Html.DisplayFor(m => child);
}

In your template for the collection model to iterate and render the children. Each child needs to strongly-typed, so you may want to create your own model types for the items, too, and have templates for those.

So for the OP question:

public class ChildModelCollection : Collection<ChildModel> { }

Will make a strongly-typed model that's a collection that can be resolved to a template like any other.

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