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This example is a simplification of the real problem, but how can I get this to compile? I would expect the generics constraints to propagate.

Since T is a TClass and TClass is a class, why isnt T a class?

public class MyClass<TClass> where TClass : class 
{
    public void FuncA<Ta>() where Ta : class
    {
    }

    public void FuncB<Tb>() where Tb : TClass
    {
    }

    public void Func<T>()
        where T : TClass
    {
        FuncA<T>();
        FuncB<T>();
    }
}

EDIT:

This actually works. Eric Lippert made me think, thanks.

Since T is a TClass and TClass is a TAnotherType, T is actually TAnotherType.

public class MyClass<TClass, TAnotherType> where TClass : TAnotherType
{
    public void FuncA<Ta>() where Ta : TClass
    {
    }

    public void FuncB<Tb>() where Tb : TAnotherType
    {
    }

    public void Func<T>()
        where T : TClass
    {
        FuncA<T>();
        FuncB<T>();
    }
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For compiling this do;

public void Func<T>()
    where T :class, TClass
{
    FuncA<T>();
    FuncB<T>();
}

because input of FunA is just a class not special class.

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Thanks! On a side note, funny how I cant do where T : TClass, class –  MatteS Nov 3 '11 at 21:38
1  
@MatteS As I wrote you should do T:class, TClass not T:TClass, class –  Saeed Amiri Nov 3 '11 at 21:40
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Since T is a TClass and TClass is a class, why isn't T a class?

Premise 1: "Bob Smith" is a proper name.

Premise 2: "A proper name" is a three word sentence fragment.

Conclusion: Therefore "Bob Smith" is a three word sentence fragment.

That logic is obviously not correct.

Premise 1: T is a TClass

Premise 2 : TClass is a class

Conclusion: Therefore T is a class.

That logic is incorrect for the same reason.

In both cases we are using "is" to mean two completely different things in the two premises. In the first premise, "is" is used to mean "these two things have the is-a-kind-of relationship between them". In the second premise, "is" is used to mean "this one thing possesses a particular characteristic".

You can see that your logic is wrong more directly by simply substituting in for T and TClass:

Premise 1: int is a System.ValueType

('is' means 'has a subclassing relationship')

Premise 2 : System.ValueType is a class

('is' means 'has a particular property, namely, being copied by reference)

Conclusion: Therefore int is a class.

And again, we come up with an incorrect conclusion because "is" is used in two inconsistent ways.

Another example:

Premise 1: A hamburger is better than nothing.

Premise 2: Nothing is better than a good steak.

Conclusion: A hamburger is better than a good steak, by transitivity.

Finally, for more thoughts on this topic, see my recent article:

http://ericlippert.com/2011/09/19/inheritance-and-representation/

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2  
If it's a good hamburger it might be. Befriend a chef and you'll be surprised by how good hamburgers can get! :) –  configurator Nov 4 '11 at 0:02
    
If we define TClass : class, we're saying TClass must be a reference type. If we then say T : TClass, we're saying that type T must be a derive/implement (or be the same as) the type passed for TClass. Since TClass is restricted to reference types, why can it not infer T as a reference type? Can you give an example where this wouldn't be the case? Or have I got this completely wrong? –  Rob Nov 4 '11 at 1:42
3  
@Rob: I did give an example where it isn't the case. Read the answer again. Why do you believe that a type derived from a reference type must be a reference type? Inheritance shares members. Other properties are not inherited. A platypus is an animal, animal is a six letter word, therefore platypus is a six letter word? I don't think so. –  Eric Lippert Nov 4 '11 at 5:40
    
+1 because that last comment was a better explanation than the original post ;) –  MatteS Nov 4 '11 at 8:33
1  
@MatteS: "is" and "to be" are the same verb. You're using "to be" to mean two different things. Stop using the verb ambiguously. "T is constrained to be a type derived from TCLass. TClass is constrained to be a type that is copied by reference." Now the intransitivity is obvious; there is no requirement that a type derived from a reference type also be copied by reference; derivation does not preserve copied-by-reference property any more than it conserves other properties, like the length of the name. –  Eric Lippert Nov 5 '11 at 13:56
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The problem is that T doesn't have to be a reference type. Consider:

MyClass<IFormattable> foo = new MyClass<IFormattable>();
MyClass.Func<int>();

That would try to call FuncA<int> but int doesn't obey the : class constraint.

So basically you need to add the : class constraint to Func<T> as well:

public void Func<T>() where T : class, TClass
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public void Func<T>() where T : TClass, class this code would not compile, should change class and TClass places. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 3 '11 at 21:39
    
As noted on Saeed's reply, apparently you have to do where T : class, TClass. –  MatteS Nov 3 '11 at 21:41
    
int is not TClass, so your example is not really good –  Sergei Bedulenko Nov 3 '11 at 21:41
1  
@invisible: But int implements IFormattable. –  BoltClock Nov 3 '11 at 21:41
    
I guess thats the thing, I would expect the call MyClass.Func<int>(); to not compile if the constraint would propagate, but apparenly they dont. –  MatteS Nov 3 '11 at 21:44
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I'm not sure if the following is a typo in your code or in your copy/paste alteration (for simplification):

public void FuncA<Ta>() where Ta : class //TClass instead of class?
{
}
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He's asking why the T : TClass constraint doesn't fulfill Ta : class when TClass itself is a class. –  BoltClock Nov 3 '11 at 21:40
    
Others have answered that part, I thought I'd take a stab at it perhaps being a typo. –  m-y Nov 3 '11 at 21:41
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Looks like you're just curious why you can't do so. And you're not interested in working example like this:

public class MyClass<TClass> where TClass : class
{
    public void FuncA<Ta>() where Ta : class
    {
    }

    public void FuncB<Tb>() where Tb : TClass
    {
    }

    public void Func()
    {
        FuncA<TClass>();
        FuncB<TClass>();
    }
}
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add comment

You all say that T : TClass and TClass : class doesn't imply T : class. Ok, so if I gave you :

public MyClass<TClass> where TClass : class
{
     public void MyFunc<T>() where T : TClass
     {
         // who cares ?
     }
}

Could you provide an example where you use a type for T that is not a class, because I really don't understand how T : TClass and TClass : class doesn't imply T : class. Please don't try to explain strange things prove it with just ONE example.

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Ho I found that : blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/09/19/… really interesting and really strange. .net is always poorly designed :D –  Toto Nov 4 '11 at 2:04
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