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I love tuples. They allow you to quickly group relevant information together without having to write a struct or class for it. This is very useful while refactoring very localized code.

Initializing a list of them however seems a bit redundant.

var tupleList = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
{
    Tuple.Create( 1, "cow" ),
    Tuple.Create( 5, "chickens" ),
    Tuple.Create( 1, "airplane" )
};

Isn't there a better way? I would love a solution along the lines of the Dictionary initializer.

Dictionary<int, string> students = new Dictionary<int, string>()
{
    { 111, "bleh" },
    { 112, "bloeh" },
    { 113, "blah" }
};

Can't we use a similar syntax?

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In this case why wouldn't you use a dictionary instead of a list of Tuples? –  Ed S. Nov 3 '11 at 22:03
2  
@Ed S.: A Dictionary doesn't allow duplicate keys. –  Steven Jeuris Nov 3 '11 at 22:04
    
@EdS.: Every time it's not a two-tuple where one item is hashable/orderable and unique. –  delnan Nov 3 '11 at 22:04
    
Good point, didn't notice the duplicate key. –  Ed S. Nov 3 '11 at 22:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 90 down vote accepted

Yes! This is possible.

The { } syntax of the collection initializer works on any IEnumerable type which has an Add method with the correct amount of arguments. Without bothering how that works under the covers, that means you can simply extend from List<T>, add a custom Add method to initialize your T, and you are done!

public class TupleList<T1, T2> : List<Tuple<T1, T2>>
{
    public void Add( T1 item, T2 item2 )
    {
        Add( new Tuple<T1, T2>( item, item2 ) );
    }
}

This allows you to do the following:

var groceryList = new TupleList<int, string>
{
    { 1, "kiwi" },
    { 5, "apples" },
    { 3, "potatoes" },
    { 1, "tomato" }
};
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5  
A downside is having to write the class. Like you, I love tuples because I don't have to write a class or struct. –  goodeye Oct 4 '12 at 16:07
2  
@goodeye So write it once and store it in a core library. ;p –  Steven Jeuris Oct 4 '12 at 18:29
    
I get it - you're writing this extension once, and still get to use the TupleList anywhere you want without creating custom classes. I was thinking you had to do this every time you used it, killing the idea of avoiding a custom class. –  goodeye Oct 11 '12 at 4:41

You can do this by calling the constructor each time with is slightly better

var tupleList = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
{
    new Tuple<int, string>(1, "cow" ),
    new Tuple<int, string>( 5, "chickens" ),
    new Tuple<int, string>( 1, "airplane" )
};
share|improve this answer
4  
I couldn't get the original code to work, so I've amended it to what I think it should be... which may reverse your opinion on whether the syntax "is slightly better" after all :) –  onedaywhen Jan 11 '13 at 16:05

A new feature coming up in C# 6 is the inclusion of extension Add methods. This is one of those features that has always existed in VB.net and is finally making it's way to C#.

Now, you'll be able to add extension methods to any collection type named Add() and it will be used in collection initializer expressions. Now you won't have to derive from your lists to add these special methods, you can simply extend it.

public static class TupleListExtensions
{
    public static void Add<T1, T2>(
            this IList<Tuple<T1, T2>> list, T1 item1, T2 item2)
    {
        list.Add(Tuple.Create(item1, item2));
    }

    public static void Add<T1, T2, T3>(
            this IList<Tuple<T1, T2, T3>> list, T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3)
    {
        list.Add(Tuple.Create(item1, item2, item3));
    }

    // and so on...
}

This will allow you to do this on any kind of list:

var numbers = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
{
    { 1, "one" },
    { 2, "two" },
    { 3, "three" },
    { 4, "four" },
    { 5, "five" },
};
var points = new ObservableCollection<Tuple<double, double, double>>
{
    { 0, 0, 0 },
    { 1, 2, 3 },
    { -4, -2, 42 },
};

Of course you're not restricted to extending collections of tuples, it can be for collections of any specific type you want special syntax for.

public static class BigIntegerListExtensions
{
    public static void Add(this IList<BigInteger> list,
        params byte[] value)
    {
        list.Add(new BigInteger(value));
    }

    public static void Add(this IList<BigInteger> list,
        string value)
    {
        list.Add(BigInteger.Parse(value));
    }
}

var bigNumbers = new List<BigInteger>
{
    new BigInteger(1), // constructor BigInteger(int)
    2222222222L,       // implicit operator BigInteger(long)
    3333333333UL,      // implicit operator BigInteger(ulong)
    { 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4 },               // extension Add(byte[])
    "55555555555555555555555555555555555555", // extension Add(string)
};
share|improve this answer
    
Wow fantastic solution! –  Ucodia Jan 7 at 9:57

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