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I have a bash script where you can specify options with "--option parameter":

if [ ${1:0:2} != '--' ] ; then 
    echo -e "Unrecognized option: $1\n$requestHelpMessage"; exit 1;
fi
if [ ! $2 ];
    then echo -e "Expected parameter for $1\n$requestHelpMessage"; exit 1;
fi
case ${1:2} in
    branch) # do something with $2 here
    batch) # do something with $2 here
    version) # do something with $2 here
    *) # you get the idea
esac

And I want to extend it to be able to handle "--option=parameter" as well. Is there an easy way to split over "=" without special-casing each one?

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3  
Just a comment, because it may not be useful to you, but parsing arguments is a pain and riddled with edge cases. Better just to use the bash builtin getopts. –  Cory Kendall Nov 3 '11 at 23:23
    
I was under the impression getopts was not so great at words, and I need this to replicate certain behavior of another script, so I don't have the freedom to use letters –  mbarrows Nov 4 '11 at 0:03
    
That's totally true. getopts doesn't really work for multiple character flags. Check out my answer below about using getopt instead. –  Jericon Nov 4 '11 at 1:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of using getopt or making your own setup, try using "getopt". It supports both long (word) and short (character) arguments.

Here's an example of it in use:

get_inputs () {
    set -- $( getopt -u -l class:,desc:,force,host:,help,verbose "c:d:fh:v?" "$@" )

    while [ $# -gt 0 ]; do 
        case "$1" in
            -c|--class)
                CLASS=$2
                shift
                ;;
            -d|--desc)  
                DESCR=$2
                shift
                ;;
            -f|--force)
                FORCE=1
                ;;
            -h|--host)
                HOST=$2
                shift
                ;;
            -v|--verbose)
                VERBOSE=1
                ;;
            --help)
                usage
                exit
                ;;
            *)
                break
                ;;
        esac
        shift
    done
}
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2  
Surely you must use "$@" in the call to getopt as otherwise, the spaces within the arguments get destroyed. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '11 at 2:05
    
+1, but while [ $# -gt 0 ] is unnecessary - $1 will always contain -- after the options, which will hit the catch-all at the end. You can use while true just as well. –  l0b0 Nov 4 '11 at 9:56

With slight changes you can accomplish what you desire:

if [[ ! $1 =~ "^--?" ]] ; then 
    echo -e "Unrecognized option: $1\n$requestHelpMessage"; exit 1;

...

case $1 in
    -*branch) # do something with $2 here
    -*batch) # do something with $2 here
    -*version) # do something with $2 here
    *) # you get the idea
esac

The tests allow for one or more -'s at the beginning of $1

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