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I have two arrays P and T. P[i] is a number, whose time stamp is T[i]; There might be duplicated time stamps.

I want to produce another two arrays Q and U, where Q[i] has time stamp U[i], and Q[i] is the sum of all elements in P that have time stamp U[i];

For example, for

P = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] T = [0, 0, 1, 1, 1]

I will produce

Q = [3, 12] U = [0, 1];

Is there a fast way of doing this in numpy, that hopefully vectorizes it?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using numpy 1.4 or better:

import numpy as np

P = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) 
T = np.array([0, 0, 1, 1, 1])

U,inverse = np.unique(T,return_inverse=True)
Q = np.bincount(inverse,weights=P)
print (Q, U)
# (array([  3.,  12.]), array([0, 1]))

Please note that this is not the fastest solution. I tested the speed this way:

import numpy as np

N = 1000
P = np.repeat(np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]),N)
T = np.repeat(np.array([0, 0, 1, 1, 1]),N)

def using_bincount():
    U,inverse = np.unique(T,return_inverse=True)
    Q = np.bincount(inverse,weights=P)
    return Q,U
    # (array([  3.,  12.]), array([0, 1]))

def using_lc():
    U = list(set(T))
    Q = [sum([p for (p,t) in zip(P,T) if t == u]) for u in U]
    return Q,U

def using_slice():
    U = np.unique(T)
    Q = np.array([P[T == u].sum() for u in U])
    return Q,U

For small arrays, wim's solution is faster (N=1):

% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_lc()'
100000 loops, best of 3: 18.4 usec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_slice()'
10000 loops, best of 3: 66.8 usec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_bincount()'
10000 loops, best of 3: 52.8 usec per loop

For large arrays, joris's solution is faster (N=1000):

% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_lc()'
100 loops, best of 3: 9.93 msec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_slice()'
1000 loops, best of 3: 390 usec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_bincount()'
1000 loops, best of 3: 846 usec per loop

I doubt it matters in this case, but benchmarks can change depending on version of numpy, python, OS, or hardware. It would not hurt to repeat these benchmarks on your machine.

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import numpy as np
P = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) 
T = np.array([0, 0, 1, 1, 1])

U = np.unique(T)
Q = np.array([P[T == u].sum() for u in U])

gives

In [17]: print Q, U
[3 12] [0 1]

Not really vectorized, but faster than the solution with lists.

If you want more powerful of this kind of group-by functions, maybe you can take a look at pandas.

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very nice! though i would use Q = np.array([P[T==u].sum() for u in U]) for consistency. –  wim Nov 3 '11 at 23:30
    
Good suggestion! Thanks –  joris Nov 3 '11 at 23:35
    
How do you measure it as faster than the solution with lists? Because I get 10000 loops, best of 3: 36.7 us per loop for this one, 10x slower than the list comprehension 100000 loops, best of 3: 3 us per loop. –  wim Nov 4 '11 at 0:18
    
I should have explained it more when I stated that. I did also some timeit tests, but on a larger array, and you can see in the timings of unutbu that in that case it is faster. So it depends on the array you want to process. –  joris Nov 4 '11 at 11:27
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>>> P = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]; T = [0, 0, 1, 1, 1]
>>> U = list(set(T))
>>> Q = [sum([p for (p,t) in zip(P,T) if t == u]) for u in U]
>>> print Q, U
[3, 12] [0, 1]
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Unfortunately, I don't think he's looking for a standard lib solution as he indicates multiple times that he's looking for vectorized solution using numpy data structures. –  Joe Holloway Nov 3 '11 at 23:23
    
The examples in the questions have lists... but for numpy array's it's even easier with using np.where –  wim Nov 3 '11 at 23:27
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