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How do you validate ISO 8601 date string (ex: 2011-10-02T23:25:42Z).

I know that there are several possible representations of ISO 8601 dates, but I'm only interested in validating the format I gave as an example above.

Thanks!

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That doesn't look correct. Shouldn't the "day" part be two digits? –  Phil Nov 4 '11 at 0:13
    
@Phil - I guess you are right. I've updated the post to reflect that. –  titel Nov 4 '11 at 0:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This worked for me, it uses a regular expression to make sure the date is in the format you want, and then tries to parse the date and recreate it to make sure the output matches the input:

<?php

$date = '2011-10-02T23:25:42Z';
var_dump(validateDate($date));

$date = '2011-17-17T23:25:42Z';
var_dump(validateDate($date));

function validateDate($date)
{
    if (preg_match('/^(\d{4})-(\d{2})-(\d{2})T(\d{2}):(\d{2}):(\d{2})Z$/', $date, $parts) == true) {
        $time = gmmktime($parts[4], $parts[5], $parts[6], $parts[2], $parts[3], $parts[1]);

        $input_time = strtotime($date);
        if ($input_time === false) return false;

        return $input_time == $time;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

You could expand further to use checkdate to make sure the month day and year are valid as well.

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2  
a) Don't use the case-insensitive flag; T and Z are the only applicable alpha characters and should both be uppercase. b) Z isn't the only valid time zone designator. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601#Dates –  Phil Nov 4 '11 at 0:56
    
@Phil Removed it, thx –  drew010 Nov 4 '11 at 0:58
    
You should also allow an optional + or - in front of the date string (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601#Years). probably a ([+|-]?) will suffice –  Luciano Mammino Sep 13 '14 at 9:00

I want to share my lightweight solution. It is not ideal, but might be helpful for someone.

function validISO8601Date($value)
{
    try {
        $timestamp = strtotime($value);
        $date = date(DATE_ISO8601, $timestamp);
        return ($date === $value);
    } catch (\Exception $e) {
        return false;
    }
}
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This seems like the most clean approach, except the timezone offset can include a colon or not in the standard, but the date function uses it or doesn't depending on whether DATE_ISO8601 or "c" is used to specify the format. –  Grayside Apr 1 '14 at 5:56
1  
For downvoters: Please explain why? I'm open for discussion! –  Jenechka Nov 20 '14 at 15:16

This is the function I use. It is similar to the answer of drew010 but works also for timestamps ending with "+01:00" or "-01:00".

function isTimestampIsoValid($timestamp)
{
    if (preg_match('/^'.
            '(\d{4})-(\d{2})-(\d{2})T'. // YYYY-MM-DDT ex: 2014-01-01T
            '(\d{2}):(\d{2}):(\d{2})'.  // HH-MM-SS  ex: 17:00:00
            '(Z|((-|\+)\d{2}:\d{2}))'.  // Z or +01:00 or -01:00
            '$/', $timestamp, $parts) == true)
    {
        try {
            new \DateTime($timestamp);
            return true;
        }
        catch ( \Exception $e)
        {
            return false;
        }
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
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Really helpful, thanks! –  Luke Cousins Sep 26 '14 at 11:34

Edit: By far the easiest method is to simply try to create a DateTime object using the string, eg

$dt = new DateTime($dateTimeString);

If the DateTime constructor cannot parse the string, it will throw an exception, eg

DateTime::__construct(): Failed to parse time string (2011-10-02T23:25:72Z) at position 18 (2): Unexpected character

Note that if you leave off the time zone designator, it will use the configured default timezone.

Second easiest method is to use a regular expression. Something like this aught to cover it

if (preg_match('/^(\d{4})-(\d{2})-(\d{2})T(\d{2}):(\d{2}):(\d{2})(Z|(\+|-)\d{2}(:?\d{2})?)$/', $dateString, $parts)) {
    // valid string format, can now check parts

    $year  = $parts[1];
    $month = $parts[2];
    $day   = $parts[3];

    // etc
}
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1  
Nice idea, but DateTime constructor is not limited to ISO 8601 input. –  Grayside Mar 31 '14 at 21:52
    
@Grayside I'm not really sure what you mean. I didn't say anything about it being limited –  Phil Mar 31 '14 at 22:17
    
@Phil well if you want to check if it is a valid iso date, then having it allow other date formats that are not iso makes it not a validation for the iso format. –  ppetermann Aug 26 '14 at 11:51

See http://www.pelagodesign.com/blog/2009/05/20/iso-8601-date-validation-that-doesnt-suck/. It gives this regex to use:

^([\+-]?\d{4}(?!\d{2}\b))((-?)((0[1-9]|1[0-2])(\3([12]\d|0[1-9]|3[01]))?|W([0-4]\d|5[0-2])(-?[1-7])?|(00[1-9]|0[1-9]\d|[12]\d{2}|3([0-5]\d|6[1-6])))([T\s]((([01]\d|2[0-3])((:?)[0-5]\d)?|24\:?00)([\.,]\d+(?!:))?)?(\17[0-5]\d([\.,]\d+)?)?([zZ]|([\+-])([01]\d|2[0-3]):?([0-5]\d)?)?)?)?$

I suppose this does not answer your question exactly, since it will match any valid ISO 8601 date, but if that is alright then this works perfectly.

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