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I want find all of the punctuation marks used my .txt file and give a count of the number of occurrences of each one. How would I go about doing this?? I am new at this but I am trying to learn! This is not homework! I have been doing research on grep and sed right now.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
$ perl -CSD -nE '$seen{$1}++ while /(\pP)/g; END { say "$_ $seen{$_}" for keys %seen }'  sometextfile.utf8

As in

$ perl -CSD -nE '$seen{$1}++ while /(\pP)/g; END { say "$_ $seen{$_}" for keys %seen }' programming_perl_4th_edition.pod | sort -k2rn
, 21761
. 19578
; 10986
( 8856
) 8853
- 7606
: 7420
" 7300
_ 5305
’ 4906
/ 4528
{ 2966
} 2947
\ 2258
@ 2121
# 2070
* 1991
' 1715
“ 1406
” 1404
[ 1007
] 1003
% 881
! 838
? 824
& 555
— 330
‑ 72
– 41
‹ 16
› 16
‐ 10
⁂ 10
… 8
· 3
「 2
」 2
« 1
» 1
‒ 1
― 1
‘ 1
• 1
‥ 1
⁃ 1
・ 1

If you want not just punctuation but punctuation and symbols, use [\pP\pS] in your pattern. Don’t use old-style POSIX classes whatever you do, though.

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Use sed, tr, sort and uniq (and no perl):

sed -E 's/[^[:punct:]]//g;s/(.)/\1x/g' myfile.txt | tr 'x' '\n' | sort | uniq -c

I did it this way (sed + tr) so it will work on both unix and mac. Mac needs an imbedded linefeed in the sed command, but unix can use \n. This way it works everywhere.

This will work on non-mac unix:

sed -E 's/[^[:punct:]]//g;s/(.)/\1\n/g' myfile.txt | sort | uniq -c
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1  
That uses the broken, please-include-symbols-too-but-only-if-they-are-ASCII, old-fashioned POSIX definition of “punctuation”. It makes no sense today. Do not use POSIX character classes. Use Unicode properties. POSIX properties suck. –  tchrist Nov 4 '11 at 1:02
    
If you think Mac isn’t Unix, you aren’t looking very closely. –  tchrist Nov 4 '11 at 1:09
    
@tchrist: are you telling us that POSIX character classes are mis-implemented (so if you're using a Unicode/UTF8 codeset, then the punctuation classes are mismanaged)? Clearly, if the tools are told to work with a single-byte codeset, then feeding them multi-byte data will give misleading results. But surely if the locale information says 'UTF8', then [[:punct:]] means 'punctuation in UTF8' and not 'punctuation in some SBCS'? Can you identify where the problem is specified in the POSIX standard? –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '11 at 1:35
    
Sections §3.89 and §7.3.1 seem to apply. In the POSIX locale, then they may be so limited; in other locales, I don't see that the limitation is specified as you claim. Implementations may be another issue altogether...they could easily be flawed. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '11 at 1:40
1  
What is an 'ASCII symbol that is not Unicode punctuation'? Is that things like '@' and '#'? It can't be that; your answer includes them...or is that deliberate? (Probably not; what you show has \pP and not [\pP\pS].) It might also come down to what the questioner wants regarded as punctuation - and 'the beautiful thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from'. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '11 at 2:00

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