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I have a problem with toggling and document functions, maybe someone can help me improve my function.

I have a toggle function that can open and close an element. If you click on the element, it opens. Then if you click on it again, it closes, which the toggle function works. I however went on to the next level where if you click on the element, it will open, and if you click outside the element (document), it closes.

However, when I click on the element again after clicking outside, I would have to click twice because it didn't to the final toggle action to close. How do I make it so i don't have to click on the element twice when I click outside to close the element. Does this make sense?

<ul>
<li id='drop'>down</li>
<ul id='menu'>
<li>menu 1</li>
<li>menu 2</li>
<li>menu 3</li>
</ul>

$('li#drop').toggle(function () {
    //show its submenu
    $('ul', this).show();
}, function () {
    //hide its submenu
    $('ul', this).hide();
}
);
$(document).click(function(){
    $('ul#menu').hide();
});
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of using .toggle(), you can test if the ul is visible when the li is clicked

$('li#drop').click(function(e){
  e.stopPropagation();

  if($('ul#menu').is(':visible')) {
    $('ul#menu').hide();
  }
  else {
    $('ul#menu').show();
  }
});
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doesn't seem like its work, the $(document).click(function... is making it not work. I'm trying to make it work –  andrewliu Nov 4 '11 at 3:48
    
sorry, there were a couple of errors in my code. Try the updated code –  Yisroel Nov 4 '11 at 3:56
    
You also need to stop propagation of the click event, or the click will bubble up to the document and hide the menu again. I've updated my code to include that. –  Yisroel Nov 4 '11 at 4:02
    
Thanks! this worked –  andrewliu Nov 4 '11 at 4:26
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toggle() stores data on the object being toggled in order to keep track of it's toggle state (so it knows which function to call the next time it's activated) so when you change the object's hide state without letting toggle() update that data, it gets confused and calls the wrong function the next time you execute it.

To solve this problem, you should probably not use toggle(), but rather just implement the toggling behavior yourself so it will work properly when called from several different places.

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