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I wrote a simple class method Buy.get_days(string), and is trying to test it with different text string inputs. However I feel it is very verbose.

  • Is there any more concise way to test the following?
  • Is there a equivalent of subject for methods which I can just keep passing different parameters in and check the results?
  • Is there a way to avoid the unnecessary description at each it?

thanks

 describe Buy do
   describe '.get_days' do
    it 'should get days' do
      Buy.get_days('Includes a 1-weeknight stay for up to 4 people')
      .should == 1
      end
    it 'should get days' do
      Buy.get_days('Includes a 1-night stay in a King Studio Room with stone fireplace')
      .should == 1
    end
    it 'should get days' do
      Buy.get_days('Includes 4 nights/5 days at the Finisterra Hotel for up to two adults and two children (staying in the same room)')
      .should == 4
    end
  end
end
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4  
How is the it description unnecessary? Just because you wrote the same text for specs that test different things doesn't mean the description shouldn't be there--maybe re-word them so they're useful? –  Dave Newton Nov 4 '11 at 5:13
    
the input/output combination is descriptive enough (for me at least). –  lulalala Nov 4 '11 at 5:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is an interesting though perhaps more obtuse way to use the 'subject' block with Class methods.

Edit: The broken link as reported by the Wayback Archive which I suppose is susceptible to the same problem.

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1  
broken link says "Posterous Spaces is no longer available" –  Jared Beck May 18 '13 at 20:24
    
@JaredBeck edited. I'll summarize the response tonight. –  TCopple May 28 '13 at 16:44
    
Content is also available as a gist: gist.github.com/timocratic/816049 –  aingram Jun 20 '13 at 20:06

There isn't a subject equivalent for calling a method, so using it is the way to go here. The issue I see with your code as presented is that it doesn't actually explain what you are testing for. I would write something more like:

describe Buy do
  describe '.get_days' do
    it 'should detect hyphenated weeknights' do
      Buy.get_days('Includes a 1-weeknight stay for up to 4 people').should == 1
    end
    it 'should detect hyphenated nights' do
      Buy.get_days('Includes a 1-night stay in a King Studio Room with stone fireplace').should == 1
    end
    it 'should detect first number' do
      Buy.get_days('Includes 4 nights/5 days at the Finisterra Hotel for up to two adults and two children (staying in the same room)').should == 4
    end
  end
end

I'm making assumptions about what you're after here, but hopefully the idea is clear. This will also lead to much more helpful error output when a test fails. Hope this helps!

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I guess the answer at the end is: there is no more concise way of writing it. –  lulalala Nov 8 '11 at 2:19
    
Yeah, afraid so. :) –  Matt Sanders Nov 17 '11 at 22:09

An alternative to using subject/it is to use before/specify:

describe '#destroy' do
  context 'with children' do
    before { @parent = FactoryGirl.create(:parent, children: FactoryGirl.create_list(:child, 2) }
    specify { @parent.destroy.should be_false }
  end
end

This will produce a reasonable description in RSpec's -fd output format:

#destroy
  with children
    should be false
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