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Our application is "sometimes" timing out, we have a Java client connecting to a unix daemon and for some reason it is now and again throwing the following error:

SocketException: Cannot establish connection to daemon
java.net.ConnectException: Connection timed out: connect
    at sun.nio.ch.Net.connect(Native Method)
    at sun.nio.ch.SocketChannelImpl.connect(Unknown Source)
    at java.nio.channels.SocketChannel.open(Unknown Source)
    at ....
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Unknown Source)

This stack trace is from the following code:

  try
  {
    InetSocketAddress inetAddress = new InetSocketAddress(InetAddress.getByName(serverName), serverPort);
    socketChannel = SocketChannel.open(inetAddress); // <--- I think the problem is here
    pipeSck = socketChannel.socket();

  }
  catch (NoRouteToHostException e)//when the remote host cannot be reached or connection was refused
  {
    System.err.println("NoRouteToHostException: Cannot establish connection to daemon");
    e.printStackTrace();
    return 1; /* reply only with error */
  }
  catch (SocketException e)//when the remote host cannot be reached or connection was refused
  {
    System.err.println("SocketException: Cannot establish connection to daemon");
    e.printStackTrace();
    return 1; /* reply only with error */
  }

This works 99% of the time... any ideas why we are getting the timeout?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

'Connection timed out' means either that the network was temporarily down, which is the most likely, or, if it isn't running on Windows, that the server's socket backlog queue was full, which could happen under extreme load or denial-of-service attacks.

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As per my other comment, the backlog is currently set to 10 (and has been for about 15 years). Our client has a lot more users now, so it looks like it's finally hit its limit. –  Samah Nov 4 '11 at 4:48
    
@Samah There is no way you can tell the actual value short of peeking the kernel, but the platform has its own minimum, and it almost certainly raises that 10 silently to at least 50. –  EJP Nov 4 '11 at 5:27
    
It's running Solaris 10, and according to this: publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/wasinfo/v6r1/topic/… the default backlog is 128. If it's silently increasing it to a minimum, I'm not sure what that would be. Edit: Running this says "1" but I'm not sure if I'm looking at the right parameter: ndd -get /dev/tcp tcp_conn_req_min –  Samah Nov 5 '11 at 0:49
    
@Samah according to the documentation I found in 12 seconds with Google, that is "The default minimum value of the maximum number of pending TCP connection requests for a listener waiting to be accepted. This is the lowest maximum value of listen(3SOCKET) an application can use." –  EJP Nov 5 '11 at 9:23
    
That's pretty much what I thought. –  Samah Nov 6 '11 at 0:24

I'd agree with Crollster, although you could also check to see if you have a firewall on the host that may be causing problems. Does the UNIX hose have a firewall? Any intermediate firewalls? Is the UNIX host on the local LAN? If not, do you have spotty internet access? Networking is fun. :)

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