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I am trying to complete my code but this one has me stumped. I want to find an element in a linked list using strings. problem is, I can only find the first element no matter how I change the code.

int findpatron(struct Library* lib1, struct Patron **p_ptr){
    int i;
    char f_name[32], l_name[32];
    struct Patron_node *currNode = lib1->patrons.node, *prevNode = NULL;
    while(currNode != NULL){
        printf("Enter the first name of patron: \n");
        scanf("%s", f_name);
        printf("Enter the last name of patron: \n");
        scanf("%s", l_name);
        if ((strcmp(currNode->patron->name.first, f_name) == 0) &&
            (strcmp(currNode->patron->name.last, l_name) == 0)){
            //prevNode = currNode;
            *p_ptr = currNode->patron;
            break;
        }
        currNode = currNode->next;
    }
    return 0;
}
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1 Answer 1

Your code seems to prompt for the patron name on each iteration of the loop, which is an unusual way of organizing things. It should probably prompt for the names outside the loop. You should also error check the calls to scanf():

if (scanf("%.31s", f_name) != 1)
    ...break...or otherwise handle I/O problem...

We might need to see how you create the list of patrons within the library. It could be that you are storing the names in the same space each time, or something similar.

Your function always returns 0; there is no point that. Either it should not return any value (void) so you don't have to check what it returns, or you should make it return a struct Patron * for the found patron, or NULL (0) if there is no matching patron.


Your structures seem to me unexpectedly deeply nested. This fragment of code compiles, but I've not spent the effort to populate the list. However, providing 5 structures is 2 or 3 levels deeper than I'd expect. It definitely complicates your life.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

struct Name
{
    char first[32];
    char last[32];
};

struct Patron
{
    struct Name name;
};

struct Patron_node
{
    struct Patron *patron;
    struct Patron_node *next;
};

struct Patron_list
{
    struct Patron_node *node;
};

struct Library
{
    struct Patron_list patrons;
};

int findpatron(struct Library* lib1, struct Patron **p_ptr)
{
    char f_name[32], l_name[32];
    struct Patron_node *currNode = lib1->patrons.node;
    printf("Enter the first name of patron: \n");
    if (scanf("%.31s", f_name) != 1)
        return -1;
    printf("Enter the last name of patron: \n");
    if (scanf("%.31s", l_name) != 1)
        return -1;
    while (currNode != NULL)
    {
        if (strcmp(currNode->patron->name.first, f_name) == 0 &&
            strcmp(currNode->patron->name.last,  l_name) == 0)
        {
            *p_ptr = currNode->patron;
            break;
        }
        currNode = currNode->next;
    }
    return 0;
}

I note I had to invent two structure names since they were not shown in your source code. At some point, you should look up the Law of Demeter and work out how to avoid violating it quite so flagrantly in your code.

For example:

int name_cmp_by_first(const struct Name *n1, const struct Name *n2)
{
    int rc = strcmp(n1->first, n2->first);
    if (rc == 0)
        rc = strcmp(n1->last, n2->last);
    return rc;
}

For the purpose at hand, it doesn't matter whether you compare first names first or last names first. In general, if you want to sort the data (for example), you would need to know which way to order them. I'm using the case-sensitive search you used; again, you might want to think about using a case-insensitive search instead. You can do that more easily when your comparisons are nicely separated and isolated as shown here.

int prompt_for_name(const char *prompt, char *name)
{
    printf("%s", prompt);
    if (scanf("%.31s", name) == 1)
        return 0;
    return -1;
}

int name_read(struct Name *name)
{
    if (prompt_for_name("first", name->first) == 0 &&
        prompt_for_name("last",  name->last)  == 0)
        return 0;
    return -1;
}

Notice that this avoids repetition in your code. Kernighan and Plauger summarized it neatly in their book 'The Elements of Programming Style':

  • The subroutine call permits us to summarize the irregularities in the argument list, where we can see quickly what is going on.
  • The subroutine itself summarizes the regularities of the code, so repeated patterns need not be used.

Then in your 'find_patron()` function:

struct Name to_be_found;
if (name_read(&to_be_found) != 0)
    return -1;  // Error return from function

while ...

    if (name_cmp_by_first(&name_to_be_found, currNode->patron->name) == 0)
        ...found the patron...

This is better; not fully clean, but better. A more realistic function would take in the name of the patron to be found and would search for that name in the list; you don't mix I/O operations such as reading the patrons name with searching operations. That is mixing up two very different operations.

share|improve this answer
    
wow thank you very much!!! it worked! but I want to error check my scanf as you suggested. what way would you recommend I do that? I keep getting a segmentation fault when I search for something that isnt in the list.. –  user1006281 Nov 4 '11 at 4:27
    
it stopped working :( –  user1006281 Nov 4 '11 at 5:58
1  
Well, go back to the last version in your VCS that was working? (What do you mean, you don't use a VCS - version control system? I'm not good enough at programming not to be able to use one; I've only been programming 25 years and I still make mistakes, and a VCS has saved my bacon many, many times!) –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '11 at 6:50

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