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Ok, so i have got myself completely stuck. My search skill are lacking and I cant find anything that makes me see what I need to do.

What I have is a Telnet App. Form1 connects and preforms the socket stuff though a class. The class is refernced on form one like so

//form1
telnet tc;

private void connect_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  tc = new telnet (IP, Port);
}

What I am trying to do is use this same method on form2. form2 is a configuration window and requires getting data from the telnet server to save to an xml file. via

 //form 1
 tc.read();

I could call a new instance of the telnet class but that would be a waste of resources and I think there's a better way to code it.

So what I would like to know is, while in form2. How do I tell a button click event to access tc from form1?

So far I haven't been able to figure out how to get the reference of form1 tc, or the connect_click button onto form 2.

 //form2
 private void read_click(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
   tc.read();  // how do i call it? or even call a method of form 1 to button click?
   ... write data from tc.read()
  }
share|improve this question
    
After reading comments I think i forgot to include a critical part of what my application is doing. I do believe I have my answer and the answers submitted I think are valuable methods which look fun to implement. But just for clarification Form 1 submits connection information and what to do commands. Form 2 is a setup form that creates an xml file with connection data, variables and so forth that form 1 uses for commands. The class simply contains the socket information. –  eatumup Nov 4 '11 at 16:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One option is to create a singleton object that owns communications.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff650316.aspx

So, if you had something like:

public class Communicator
{
    Telnet m_telnet;

    private static Communicator instance;

    private Communicator() {m_telnet = new Telnet()}

    public static Communicator Instance
    {
        get {
            if (instance == null) {
                instance = new Communicator();
         }
         return instance;
     }

     public string DoSomething()
     {
         return m_telnet.DoSomething();
     }
   }
}

Then, in your form functions you could just:

Communicator.Instance.DoSomething();

Since different forms are accessing this object, shouldn't need to be thread safe. If it does, then you can use a double lock pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
i think a singleton is overkill. he probably really wants a new telnet session every time the connect button is clicked. making the member property a static is easier, and in this case, appropriate. –  Jason Nov 4 '11 at 4:24
    
@Jason: No - that creates coupling where views are poking at each other. That's the reason MVC has been around for quite awhile and new patterns like MVVM are cropping up. Having views poke at each other ends up creating spaghetti code that's coupled, hard to change and fragile. Separating communication out of your views, it's a good layered design. –  bryanmac Nov 4 '11 at 4:31
    
sure, i'm well familiar with these patterns, but i still wouldn't implement it as a singleton. singleton is for ensuring that only a single instance of an object is returned. in this case he actually wants a new instance of the telnet session each time the 'connect' button is clicked. so, perhaps we are talking about a service that returns the current instance of the telnet object, but provide a method that allows Form1 to set what that instance is. Please see my edit –  Jason Nov 4 '11 at 4:44
    
Now that I'm looking at my implementation, i guess it's a singleton, but it can be changed, which is important in this case. –  Jason Nov 4 '11 at 4:51
    
Wow, this has given me a good place to start. Thank you everyone. To clear up what I'm after, I was trying to make sure that there is only ever one connection at a time made to the telnet server. So only one instance. Mostly because I did not want to rewrite negotiations, checks, and so forth. But the more I think about it, A new instance might be the better way to go. But seeing your examples to create a shared class referencing the original class intrigues me. I might do that just because it looks fun. Its also a method I feel I should learn. –  eatumup Nov 4 '11 at 16:19

I know this is a step beyond your current problem, but it will be important in the future, and solve this problem of where to instantiate the class, and how to share that instance.

Don't instantiate the telnet class in either form. Use Dependency Injection instead. Instantiate Telnet at the top level of your application, and pass it to both forms.

This will help you separate concerns within your application, and will make it easier to do unit testing on your app in the future (because you can create a fake Telnet for them to use).

Something like:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // maybe get these from the command line, or from app.config
    const string ipAddress = "10.0.0.1";
    const string port = "80";

    var telnet = new Telnet(ipAddress, port);

    var mainForm = new MainForm(telnet);
    mainForm.ShowDialog();
}

// ...

public class MainForm : Form
{
    private Telnet telnet;

    public MainForm(Telnet telnet)
    {
        this.telnet = telnet;
    }

    // Todo: Use telnet in other methods

    private void ShowSubForm()
    {
        var subForm = new SubForm(telnet);
        subForm.Show();
    }
}

This is better than a Singleton or static instance because it will enable you to change your app more easily in the future, it will allow you to reuse your Telnet class in the future, won't restrict you to only have one Telnet instance per program, and will make it much easier to write unit tests for your code, when you get to that point.

If you need to get information on which IP and Port to use from the main form, use the Factory Pattern, create the factory in Main, and pass it to the form. Then call the factory in the constructor of MainForm:

public class TelnetFactory
{
    public Telnet Create(string ipAddress, string portNumber)
    {
        return new Telnet(ipAddress, portNumber);
    }
}

// ...

public class MainForm : Form
{
    private TelnetFactory telnetFactory;
    private Telnet telnet;

    public MainForm(TelnetFactory telnetFactory)
    {
        this.telnetFactory = telnetFactory;
    }

    // Called by a UI action of some sort...
    private void Connect(string ipAddress, string portNumber)
    {
        if(this.telnet != null)
        {
            this.telnet = telnetFactory.Create(ipAddress, portNumber);
        }
    }

    // Todo: Use telnet in other methods

    // Todo: Just pass the existing telnet instance to SubForm
}

If you are creating both forms in a third intermediary class, instead of creating one form from inside another form, you can still use these patterns. Simply create the Telnet instance in that intermediary class, or pass a factory to that intermediary class.

share|improve this answer

Why not place the code from form one in it's own method and declare that method as public static like this.

public static void connect()
{
  tc = new telnet (IP, Port);
}
share|improve this answer
    
because that has one form poking at the other which creates unnecessary coupling –  bryanmac Nov 4 '11 at 4:28

You need to either use a singleton or provide a reference to the telnet class to the form2 when form2 is created. If a singleton then all communication will go through the same telnet class, so the best way would be to remove the constructors and replace it with a static call that gets the single instance. If passing it by reference, you'll want to have whatever instantiates the telnet class that you want to reference, either passes it back to whatever creates it, or creates form2.

share|improve this answer

update based on bryanmac's comment. i was proposing a static method in the interest of getting something done quickly. here's a more appropriate, non singleton, implementation (based on bryan's code)

public static class Communicator
{
    private static Communicator _instance;
    private Communicator() {}

    public static Telnet Telnet 
    { 
      get
      {
         if (_instance == null) 
         { 
            throw new InvalidOperationException("No telnet session established"); 
         }

         return _instance;
      }
    }

     public static void OpenSession(string ip, int port)
     {
         _instance = new telnet(ip, port);
     }
}

// form1
private void connect_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  Communicator.OpenSession(IP, Port);
}

//form2
 private void read_click(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
   Communicator.Telnet.Read();
  }
share|improve this answer
    
That has one form view poking at the other form view which creates unnecessary coupling and problematic code to maintain over time. Read about MVC, MVVM, etc... –  bryanmac Nov 4 '11 at 4:29

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