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Is it a bad practice to have enums in c++ directly at namespace level? I mean not associated with any class? Say if I have an enum and a class that looks something like this,

enum Player { USER, COMPUTER}

class Game {
//Logic of the game.
};

So should I be declaring the Player enum as a member of game class? Should it be private?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, there's nothing inherently wrong with an enum being public. Bear in mind, however, that enumerated constants cannot be qualified with the name of the enclosing enum type. That is, you cannot write Player::USER or similar to refer to the USER constant; they appear directly in the enclosing namespace. As such, it might be a good idea to set a prefix for your constants so that no name collisions occur.

For instance, consider the following declaration:

enum Player {
  PL_USER,
  PL_COMPUTER
}

This is safer, because name collisions are much less likely with the "PL_" prefix. Additionally, it improves code readability by hinting at which enum a given constant belongs to.

Languages like C# and Java have adopted a slightly different approach to enums, where one has to specify both the name of the enumeration and the name of the constant, such as Player.USER. A similar effect can be achieved in C++ by embedding the enum declaration within a namespace of its own. For example:

namespace Player {
  enum Type {
    USER,
    COMPUTER
  }
}

This has the effect of embedding PLAYER and COMPUTER in the Player namespace instead of the global (or otherwise enclosing) namespace. Whether this is a good approach or not is, in my opinion, a matter of preference.

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Thanks a lot! that makes sense... –  Ajai Nov 4 '11 at 7:19
    
Instead of two-character cryptic prefix, consider e.g. struct Player { enum Enum{ user, computer }; };. In a year or two that might be unnecessary as compilers start supporting C++11 features. But until then... Anyway, it's a good idea to reserve ALL UPPERCASE for macros. Many people do that. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '11 at 7:21
1  
@Martin: I prefer the struct precisely because it introduces a type. That's very convenient (e.g. you can inherit from it). A type does not use memory or anything: it's zero cost. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '11 at 7:29
2  
Note that putting the enum in a namespace or a struct not only puts the names of the constants in the namespace or struct, but also the names of the type. So if the client code wants to declare a variable of the type, he must write Player::Type, and not just Type. If you have C++11, you can use enum class Type to put the enum constants into the scope of the enum itself (and inhibit the automatic conversion to int). –  James Kanze Nov 4 '11 at 8:30
1  
re "enumerated constants need not be qualified with the name of the enclosing enum type", in C++03, or for a plain enum type in C++11, they can't be so qualified. visual c++ allows it a language extension. but it's not standard c++ –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 24 '13 at 5:34

If enum Player is used ...

  • just within class Game --> put in private scope
  • used by class Game and its children classes --> put in protected scope
  • It relates to class Game and being used at various places --> put in public scope
  • Nowhere related to Game --> put in global / namespace scope
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Generally use minimum scope for anything.

That makes it easier to understand things.

However, the clarity or lack thereof due to placement of that enum inside or outside a class, is nothing compared to the shouting, the use of ALL UPPERCASE IDENTIFIERS. Reserve those for macros. In Java they're used for constants because Java got its look and feel from C, where it's not so unusual to define constants as macros (because early C didn't have const). Note that Java does not have a preprocessor, no macros. It's more than a bit silly to take a convention that originated with C, for keeping macros in a separate "namespace", and applying it without understanding to something else so as to be at completely cross purpose with the original intent.

Cheers & hth.,

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C++ also got it's look and feel from C... –  kmac Nov 19 at 17:27
    
@kmac: C++ got it's basic syntax directly from C, not just look and feel. And C++ extended it and changed it, in the tradition of C at the time, which was also very much in flux. In early C the creators often used lowercase macro names. You can see vestiges of that in e.g. assert and errno and so on. The uppercase convention evolved to become dominant as time passed and experience mounted. But it was for the purpose of minimizing name collisions for macros. Java does not have macros, and adopted the convention for its use for defining constants in C. That use is irrelevant in C++. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 19 at 17:33

This is purely a matter of preference; however, I tend to go with Java-like enums in C++:

class PlayerType {
  public:
     enum VALUE {USER, COMPUTER};
     explicit PlayerType(VALUE val) : value_(val) {}

     operator VALUE() const { return value_; }
     bool operator==(VALUE other) const { return value_ == other; }
     bool operator!=(VALUE other) const { return value_ != other; }
  private:
     VALUE value_;
     // Copy and assign intentionally allowed.
};

The reason I tend to do this is that it is not uncommon to need to add additional functionality (such as conversion to/from string representations) later, and so this structure makes it easy to extend.

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Could you please stop shouting –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '11 at 7:18
    
+1 for the nice example... But I just had the doubt whether having a constant enum declaration as public would be a bad practice (similar to declaring public variables). –  Ajai Nov 4 '11 at 7:21
    
@AlfP.Steinbach, what do you mean? –  Michael Aaron Safyan Nov 4 '11 at 7:21
1  
TO MY EYES AND TO THE EYES OF MANY OTHER PEOPLE, ALL UPPERCASE IS VISUALLY NOISY, LIKE SHOUTING. MANY C++ FAQS, INCLUDING BJARNE'S, RECOMMEND RESERVING ALL UPPERCASE FOR MACROS. THAT IS BECAUSE MACROS DO NOT RESPECT SCOPES, SO IT'S NICE TO HAVE A DIFFERENT NAME FORM FOR THEM (AND ALSO, THAT THE SHOUTING IS RESTRICTED TO EVIL MACROS, SO THAT IT HAS THE POSITIVE EFFECT OF LEADING YOUR ATTENTION TO INSTANCES OF EVIL PRACTICES). CHEERS & HTH., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '11 at 7:27
    
@AlfP.Steinbach, ok, thanks for the clarification. While that is generally the case, all upper case is a fairly common convention for any constant (both macros and enums included), though there are others who prefer the kConstant style, instead, for non-macro constants. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Nov 4 '11 at 8:46

If it only is used inside the Game class, I would have put the enum inside it.

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It is better to define enum within namespace

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