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I am trying to write a regular expression that will count the number of times two words co-occur within a certain proximity (within 5 words of each other) in a string, without double counting words.

For example, if I had a string:

"The man liked his big hat. The hat was very big."

In this case, the regex should see the "big hat" in the first sentence and the "hats are big" in the second sentence, returning a total of 2. Note that in the second sentence, there are several words between "hat" and "big", they also appear in a different order than the first sentence, but they still occur within a 5-word window.

If regular expressions are not the correct way to approach this problem, please let me know what I should try instead.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A bit like Stephen C but using library classes to assist in the mechanics.

    String input = "The man liked his big hat. The hat was very big";
    int proximity = 5;

    // split input into words
    String[] words = input.split("[\\W]+");

    // create a Deque of the first <proximity> words
    Deque<String> haystack = new LinkedList<String>(Arrays.asList(Arrays.copyOfRange(words, 0, proximity)));

    // count duplicates in the first <proximity> words
    int count = haystack.size() - new HashSet<String>(haystack).size();
    System.out.println("initial matches: " + count);

    // process the rest of the words
    for (int i = proximity; i < words.length; i++) {
        String word = words[i];
        System.out.println("matching '" + word + "' in [" + haystack + "]");

        if (haystack.contains(word)) {
            System.out.println("matched word " + word + " at index " + i);
            count++;
        }

        // remove the first word
        haystack.removeFirst();
        // add the current word
        haystack.addLast(word);
    }

    System.out.println("total matches:" + count);
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If regular expressions are not the correct way to approach this problem, please let me know what I should try instead.

Regexes might work, but they are not the best way to do this.

A better way to do this is to break the input string into a sequence of words (e.g. using String.split(...)) and then loop through the sequence something like this:

String[] words = input.split("\\s");
int count = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < words.length; i++) {
    if (words[i].equals("big")) {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < words.length && j - i < 5; j++) {
            if (words[j].equals("hat")) {
                count++;
            }
        }
    }
}
// And repeat for "hat" followed by "big".

You may need to vary that depending on exactly what you are trying to count, but that's the general idea.


If you need to do this for many, many combinations of words, then it would be worth looking for a more efficient solution. But as a once-off or low volume use-case, simplest is best.

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I was considering something like this, but it seemed a bit brute force-ish and I also believe it would end up double counting some of the words. –  Dan Q Nov 4 '11 at 7:13

Gee... all that code in the other answers... how about this one line solution:

int count = input.split("big( \\b.*?){1,5}hat").length + input.split("hat( \\b.*?){1,5}big").length - 2;
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You would need to know which words you're looking for. –  ptomli Nov 4 '11 at 12:17

This regex will match each occurence of two words co-occur within 5 words of each other

([a-zA-Z]+)(?:[^ ]* ){0,5}\1[^a-zA-Z]
  • ([a-zA-Z]+) will match word if you can etheir match [0-9] in your words you can replace ([a-zA-Z0-9]+).

  • (?:[^ ]* ){0,5} to match between 0 and 5 words

  • \1[^a-zA-Z] to match the repetition of your word

Then you can use this with a Pattern and find each occurence of repetited word

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