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This is my post increment operator overloading declaration.

loc loc::operator++(int x)
{
    loc tmp=*this;
    longitude++;
    latitude++;
    retrun tmp;
} 

My class constructor

loc(int lg, int lt) 
{
   longitude = lg;
   latitude = lt;
}

In main function, I have coded like below

int main()
{
    loc ob1(10,5);
    ob1++;
}

While compiling this , i am getting the below error

opover.cpp:56:5: error: prototype for ‘loc loc::operator++(int)’ does not match any in class ‘loc’ opover.cpp:49:5: error: candidate is: loc loc::operator++() opover.cpp: In function ‘int main()’: opover.cpp:69:4: error: no ‘operator++(int)’ declared for postfix ‘++’

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You fail to show the class declaration –  sehe Nov 4 '11 at 7:55
2  
Show us your class declaration? is loc::operator++(int x) declared in opover.h? –  Tio Pepe Nov 4 '11 at 7:56

3 Answers 3

Fix your class declaration from

class loc
{
    // ...
    loc operator++();
} 

to

class loc
{
    // ...
    loc operator++(int);
} 

[Edit removed misguided remarks about returning by value. Returning by value is of course the usual semantics for postfix operator++]

share|improve this answer
2  
Why should we have parameter in operator++ function? This is unary operation.. we don't have to pass anything inside –  Vitaly Dyatlov Nov 4 '11 at 8:02
    
@VitalyDyatlov: I don't think we have to. You'd have to ask the OP what he wants to achieve. Regardless, the prototypes should match and I don't think the C++ specs forbid a parameter list. There just won't be a very useful way to invoke the operator except by calling obj.operator++(42). Fixing my recommendation though, since you are right, this smells like a mistake –  sehe Nov 4 '11 at 8:04
2  
@VitalyDyatlov the parameter is to distinguish between post- and prefix increment. –  CyberSpock Nov 4 '11 at 8:09
1  
Sorry, I was wrong.. apologies. Here stackoverflow.com/questions/4421706/operator-overloading is explained overloading. without input parqams we have prefix overloading ++x, with int as function params we have postfix overloading x++, so this is just to differentiate prefix and postfix.. sorry for making mistake –  Vitaly Dyatlov Nov 4 '11 at 8:09
1  
Returning copies from operator++ is the usual semantics if you are implementing post-increment rather than preincrement. What you suggest is implementing a different operator that has different semantics –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 4 '11 at 8:15

you should have two versions of ++:

loc& loc::operator++() //prefix increment (++x)
{
    longitude++;
    latitude++;
    return *this;
} 

loc loc::operator++(int) //postfix increment (x++)
{
    loc tmp(longtitude, langtitude);
    operator++();
    return tmp;
}

And, of course, both functions should be defined in class prototype:

loc& operator++();
loc operator++(int);
share|improve this answer

You didn't declare the overloaded operator in your class definition.

Your class should look something like this:

class loc{
public:
    loc(int, int);
    loc operator++(int);
    // whatever else
}

** edit **

After reading the comments, I noticed that in your error message it shows that you declared loc operator++(), so just fix that.

share|improve this answer
    
not entirely true. he didn't declare the right signature, though –  sehe Nov 4 '11 at 7:57
    
hehe the art of reading the error messages :) –  sehe Nov 4 '11 at 8:00
    
yeah, got it:)) –  littleadv Nov 4 '11 at 8:02

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