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I have this kind of array:

   $a = array(
    'one' => 'one',
    '0' => '0',
    'two' => 'two',
    'three' => 'three',
    'four'              
   );

as you can see it is an associative array BUT not all the keys have the value (take a look at the last). My question is, how can i loop this kind of array to get key(if exists) and the respective value?

Thank you!

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what does array_keys() output? –  user247245 Nov 4 '11 at 8:08
    
the follow(strange) result: one,0,two,three,1 –  Dail Nov 4 '11 at 8:11
    
codaddict explains in his answer why you get this result. –  scessor Nov 4 '11 at 8:13
    
well 'four' can be taken as $a[1] as well. So, $a['four'] is not set, rather four is a value at the index 1. –  abhinav Nov 4 '11 at 8:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The string 'four' in your example is not a key but a value. The corresponding key will be 1. This happens because PHP converts the string key '0' to numeric key 0 and for the value 'four' it uses the next numeric key which will be 1.

Reference:

A key may be either an integer or a string. If a key is the standard representation of an integer, it will be interpreted as such (i.e. "8" will be interpreted as 8, while "08" will be interpreted as "08")

To have a key with no value you can use NULL as the value:

'four'  => null

Similarly to have an empty key use null as key:

null => 'four'

And to loop over such an array you can use a foreach loop. To detect if a key/value is null or not you can use the isset function.

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ok, but how to understand if a key was set or not? if it returns 1 i CAN'T understand if that key is true or not... how can i do? –  Dail Nov 4 '11 at 8:13

With var_dump($a); you see all keys and values:

array(5) {
    ["one"]   => string(3) "one"
    [0]       => string(1) "0"
    ["two"]   => string(3) "two"
    ["three"] => string(5) "three"
    [1]       => string(4) "four"
}
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please take a look at the comment I gave to codaddict –  Dail Nov 4 '11 at 8:14
    
Every value has ever a key in an array. In your example you could check if your key is an string with is_string($key) in a for loop. –  scessor Nov 4 '11 at 8:16
    
I can't because i also have 0, it is a number so i can't check if there is a string or not because maybe some keys should be numeric for true. –  Dail Nov 4 '11 at 8:23
    
If each value has the same content as the key if the key is available, you can check with isset() (here: isset($a[$value]) or isset($a['four'])). –  scessor Nov 4 '11 at 8:27

you can use the foreach construction:

foreach($a as $key=>$val){
    // $key is a current key
    // $val is tha current value associated
}
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As described in PHP: Arrays

A key may be either an integer or a string. If a key is the standard representation of an integer, it will be interpreted as such (i.e. "8" will be interpreted as 8, while "08" will be interpreted as "08"). Floats in key are truncated to integer. The indexed and associative array types are the same type in PHP, which can both contain integer and string indices.

So you cannot distinguish key '0' and 0. And your last element is not a key, it is a value with auto incremental integer key 1. You can check with var_dump($a):

array(5) {
  ["one"]=>
  string(3) "one"
  [0]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["two"]=>
  string(3) "two"
  ["three"]=>
  string(5) "three"
  [1]=>
  string(4) "four"
}

If you can ensure all your keys do not start with digit, then you can just iterate the array as usual, and test the key using is_int.

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