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Is this actually doable? I have some very long regex pattern rules that are hard to understand because they don't fit into the screen at once. Example:

test = re.compile('(?P<full_path>.+):\d+:\s+warning:\s+Member\s+(?P<member_name>.+)\s+\((?P<member_type>%s)\) of (class|group|namespace)\s+(?P<class_name>.+)\s+is not documented' % (self.__MEMBER_TYPES), re.IGNORECASE)

Backslash or triple quotes won't work.

EDIT. I ended using the VERBOSE more. Here's how the regexp pattern looks now:

test = re.compile('''
  (?P<full_path>                                  # Capture a group called full_path
    .+                                            #   It consists of one more characters of any type
  )                                               # Group ends                      
  :                                               # A literal colon
  \d+                                             # One or more numbers (line number)
  :                                               # A literal colon
  \s+warning:\s+parameters\sof\smember\s+         # An almost static string
  (?P<member_name>                                # Capture a group called member_name
    [                                             #   
      ^:                                          #   Match anything but a colon (so finding a colon ends group)
    ]+                                            #   Match one or more characters
   )                                              # Group ends
   (                                              # Start an unnamed group 
     ::                                           #   Two literal colons
     (?P<function_name>                           #   Start another group called function_name
       \w+                                        #     It consists on one or more alphanumeric characters
     )                                            #   End group
   )*                                             # This group is entirely optional and does not apply to C
   \s+are\snot\s\(all\)\sdocumented''',           # And line ends with an almost static string
   re.IGNORECASE|re.VERBOSE)                      # Let's not worry about case, because it seems to differ between Doxygen versions
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7  
re.VERBOSE example –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 4 '11 at 8:27
    
@J.F. Sebastian: I had to give +1 for re.DEBUG alone, that will make my life so much easier in the future! –  Makis Nov 4 '11 at 8:39
    
@J.F.Sebastian: I upvoted your answer in behind the link because in the end I still ended up using it even though it required more editing (had to make sure every whitespace is marked correctly). –  Makis Nov 4 '11 at 12:31
    
The literal style of comments e.g., ') # Group ends' is not very useful. I've used it in my example only to answer the corresponding question. In real code you should assume that a reader already knows what () means inside a regex. The logic is the same as for code comments. Here's a better example (note: (?x) plays role of re.VERBOSE). –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 4 '11 at 14:33
    
btw, @N3dst4's answer provides a nicer alternative to (?x) by enabling syntax highlighting. Also you could use [ ] or \ to escape a space. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 4 '11 at 14:39
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

e.g. like that:

test = re.compile(('(?P<full_path>.+):\d+:\s+warning:\s+Member'
                   '\s+(?P<member_name>.+)\s+\((?P<member_type>%s)\) '
                   'of (class|group|namespace)\s+(?P<class_name>.+)'
                   '\s+is not documented') % (self.__MEMBER_TYPES), re.IGNORECASE)

Put the whole string into (), and don't forget to always set ' or ".

See the docs.

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From http://docs.python.org/reference/lexical_analysis.html#string-literal-concatenation:

Multiple adjacent string literals (delimited by whitespace), possibly using different quoting conventions, are allowed, and their meaning is the same as their concatenation. Thus, "hello" 'world' is equivalent to "helloworld". This feature can be used to reduce the number of backslashes needed, to split long strings conveniently across long lines, or even to add comments to parts of strings, for example:

re.compile("[A-Za-z_]"       # letter or underscore
           "[A-Za-z0-9_]*"   # letter, digit or underscore
          )

Note that this feature is defined at the syntactical level, but implemented at compile time. The ‘+’ operator must be used to concatenate string expressions at run time. Also note that literal concatenation can use different quoting styles for each component (even mixing raw strings and triple quoted strings).

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1  
+1 for detailed documentation quoting. –  Joël Nov 4 '11 at 10:06
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The Python compiler will automatically concatenate adjacent string literals. So one way you can do this is to break up your regular expression into multiple strings, one on each line, and let the Python compiler recombine them. It doesn't matter what whitespace you have between the strings, so you can have line breaks and even leading spaces to align the fragments meaningfully.

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Either use string concatenation like in the answer of naeg or use re.VERBOSE/re.X, but be careful this option will ignore whitespace and comments. You have some spaces in your regex, so those would be ignored and you need to either escape them or use \s

So e.g.

test = re.compile("""(?P<full_path>.+):\d+: # some comment
    \s+warning:\s+Member\s+(?P<member_name>.+) #another comment
    \s+\((?P<member_type>%s)\)\ of\ (class|group|namespace)\s+
    (?P<class_name>.+)\s+is\ not\ documented""" % (self.__MEMBER_TYPES), re.IGNORECASE | re.X)
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I tried this first, but it didn't work. Maybe I made some error, but my initial thought was that Python included the white space. At least when I print something in that style, whitespaces are printed as well. –  Makis Nov 4 '11 at 9:00
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Personally, I don't use re.VERBOSE because I don't like to escape the blank spaces and I don't want to put '\s' instead of blank spaces when '\s' isn't required.
The more the symbols in a regex pattern are precise relatively to the characters sequences that must be catched, the faster the regex object acts. I nearly never use '\s'

.

To avoid re.VERBOSE, you can do as it has been already said:

test = re.compile(
'(?P<full_path>.+)'
':\d+:\s+warning:\s+Member\s+' # comment
'(?P<member_name>.+)'
'\s+\('
'(?P<member_type>%s)' # comment
'\) of '
'(class|group|namespace)'
#      ^^^^^^ underlining something to point out
'\s+'
'(?P<class_name>.+)'
#      vvv overlining something important too
'\s+is not documented'\
% (self.__MEMBER_TYPES),

re.IGNORECASE)

Pushing the strings to the left gives a lot of space to write comments.

.

But this manner isn't so good when the pattern is very long because it isn't possible to write

test = re.compile(
'(?P<full_path>.+)'
':\d+:\s+warning:\s+Member\s+' # comment
'(?P<member_name>.+)'
'\s+\('
'(?P<member_type>%s)' % (self.__MEMBER_TYPES)  # !!!!!! INCORRECT SYNTAX !!!!!!!
'\) of '
'(class|group|namespace)'
#      ^^^^^^ underlining something to point out
'\s+'
'(?P<class_name>.+)'
#      vvv overlining something important too
'\s+is not documented',

re.IGNORECASE)

then in case the pattern is very long, the number of lines between
the part % (self.__MEMBER_TYPES) at the end
and the string '(?P<member_type>%s)' to which it is applied
can be big and we loose the easiness in reading the pattern.

.

That's why I like to use a tuple to write a very long pattern:

pat = ''.join((
'(?P<full_path>.+)',
# you can put a comment here, you see: a very very very long comment
':\d+:\s+warning:\s+Member\s+',
'(?P<member_name>.+)',
'\s+\(',
'(?P<member_type>%s)' % (self.__MEMBER_TYPES), # comment here
'\) of ',
# comment here
'(class|group|namespace)',
#       ^^^^^^ underlining something to point out
'\s+',
'(?P<class_name>.+)',
#      vvv overlining something important too
'\s+is not documented'))

.

This manner allows to define the pattern as a function:

def pat(x):

    return ''.join((\
'(?P<full_path>.+)',
# you can put a comment here, you see: a very very very long comment
':\d+:\s+warning:\s+Member\s+',
'(?P<member_name>.+)',
'\s+\(',
'(?P<member_type>%s)' % x , # comment here
'\) of ',
# comment here
'(class|group|namespace)',
#       ^^^^^^ underlining something to point out
'\s+',
'(?P<class_name>.+)',
#      vvv overlining something important too
'\s+is not documented'))

test = re.compile(pat(self.__MEMBER_TYPES), re.IGNORECASE)
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