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These days we can drag & drop files into a special container and upload them with XHR 2. Many at a time. With live progress bars etc. Very cool stuff. Example here.

But sometimes we don't want that much coolness. What I'd like is to drag & drop files -- many at a time -- into a standard HTML file input: <input type=file multiple>.

Is that possible? Is there some way to 'fill' the file input with the right filenames (?) from the file drop? (Full filepaths aren't available for file system security reasons.)

Why? Because I'd like to submit a normal form. For all browsers and all devices. The drag & drop is just progressive enhancement to enhance & simplify UX. The standard form with standard file input (+ multiple attribute) will be there. I'd like to add the HTML5 enhancement.

edit
I know in some browsers you can sometimes (almost always) drop files into the file input itself. I know Chrome usually does this, but sometimes it fails and then loads the file in the current page (a big fail if you're filling out a form). I want to fool- & browserproof it.

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1  
Prepare for some pain if you want to include mac/safari in your compatibilities. –  Shark8 Nov 10 '11 at 19:37
1  
@Shark8 actually Safari/Mac is one of the few browsers already supporting this. –  Ricardo Tomasi Nov 14 '11 at 7:28
    
Actually, none of the browsers support this. The file input field is read-only (for security) and that's the problem. Stupid security! –  Rudie Nov 15 '11 at 13:21
1  
By this i meant "drag & drop files -- many at a time -- into a standard HTML file input". –  Ricardo Tomasi Nov 15 '11 at 22:01
3  
drag/drop multiple files to input type="file" multiple works fine in Safari –  Lloyd Nov 28 '11 at 12:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In theory, you could add an element overlaying the <input/>, and then use it's drop event to capture the files (using the File API) and pass them to input files array.

Except that a file input is read-only. This is an old problem.

You can however, bypass the form control completely and upload via XHR (not sure about the support for that):

You could also use an element in the surrounding area to cancel the drop event in Chrome, and prevent the default behaviour of loading the file.

Dropping multiple files over the input already works in Safari and Firefox.

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1  
Like I said in the question: I know XHR2 and I don't want to use it. I guess the iportant part: "the file input is read-only". That sucks... Cancelling the drop event isn't a bad idea! Not as good as I'd hoped, but probably the best. Dropping multiple files works in Chrome too btw. Chrome now also allows uploading directories. All very kewl and not helping my case =( –  Rudie Nov 15 '11 at 13:02

This is the "DTHML" HTML5 way to do it. Normal form input (which IS read only as Ricardo Tomasi pointed out). Then if a file is dragged in, it is attached to the form. This WILL require modification to the action page to accept the file uploaded this way.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<style>
  #holder.hover { border: 10px dashed #0c0 !important; }
</style>
<form method="post" action="http://example.com/">
  <input type="file"><input id="fileDragName"><input id="fileDragSize"><input id="fileDragType"><input id="fileDragData">
  <div id="holder" style="width:200px; height:200px; border: 10px dashed #ccc" id="holder"></div>
</form>
<script>
function readfiles(files) {
  for (var i = 0; i < files.length; i++) {
    document.getElementById('fileDragName').value = files[i].name
    document.getElementById('fileDragSize').value = files[i].size
    document.getElementById('fileDragType').value = files[i].type
    document.getElementById('fileDragData').value = files[i].slice();
    reader = new FileReader();
    reader.onload = function(event) {
      document.getElementById('fileDragData').value = event.target.result;}
    reader.readAsDataURL(files[i]);
  }
}
var holder = document.getElementById('holder');
holder.ondragover = function () { this.className = 'hover'; return false; };
holder.ondragend = function () { this.className = ''; return false; };
holder.ondrop = function (e) {
  this.className = '';
  e.preventDefault();
  readfiles(e.dataTransfer.files);
} 
</script>
</body>
</html>

It is even more boss if you can make the whole window a drop zone, see How do I detect a HTML5 drag event entering and leaving the window, like Gmail does?

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1  
Good solution yet it does not work on IE < 10 because IE 9 and less does not support HTML5 files API :( –  Dušan Radojević Dec 8 '13 at 2:04

I made a solution for this, here is a jsFiddle demo:

The Drag and Drop functionallity for this method only works with Chrome, Firefox and Safari. (Don't know if it works with IE10), but for other browsers, the "Or click here" button works fine.

The input field simply follow your mouse when dragging a file over an area, and i've added a button aswell..

Uncomment opacity:0; the file input is only visible so you can see what's going on.

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2  
That's not a solution. That's a nasty, dirty, bad hack. It's also functionally not what I mean. I don't want the file input to disappear. I want to be able to select a file the usual way too. –  Rudie Oct 3 '12 at 18:02
    
That's why i added a button aswell^^ But yah your'e right. I wouln't use it eather... Or would i !? –  BjarkeCK Oct 3 '12 at 18:23
    
'A button' is not good enough. People expect a file input. It's a hacky, nasty solution, but it does kinda work. What does it do in IE? edit IE9 looks alright. I'm not a fan of the button, but it opens the usual file dialog. I would totally use it if I were you! –  Rudie Oct 3 '12 at 22:01
    
Doesn't work in IE 10 anymore =( fiddle.jshell.net/BADfT/52 –  Rudie Apr 8 '13 at 21:49

What you could do, is display a file-input and overlay it with your transparent drop-area, being careful to use a name like file[1]. {Be sure to have the enctype="multipart/form-data" inside your FORM tag.}

Then have the drop-area handle the extra files by dynamically creating more file inputs for files 2..number_of_files, be sure to use the same base name, populating the value-attribute appropriately.

Lastly (front-end) submit the form.


All that's required to handle this method is to alter your procedure to handle an array of files.

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1  
The file input has a multiple attribute these days. No need for more than 1 file input. That's not the issue though. How do I get the File objects into the file input? I'm thinking this requires some code example... –  Rudie Nov 11 '11 at 22:44
    
@Rudie you can't, that's the problem. –  Ricardo Tomasi Nov 14 '11 at 7:17
1  
Can't what? Multiple? Yes, you can. I just said that. The multiple isn't the problem. The getting the files from a (dragged) File object into a file input, that's the problem. –  Rudie Nov 15 '11 at 12:54

Try this jQuery plugin

http://plugins.jquery.com/project/drag-drop-files-uploads

Update:

also try this:

http://lagoscript.org/jquery/upload/demo?locale=en

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The jQuery plugin uses FormData (which I didn't know) to build the request packet. That's cool. It did help me with another problem =) The downside is you can't interact much with a FormData object. (Only append data.) (I updated my demo though.) The whole thing still doesn't allow for dropping a file into a file input and then continue filling out the form and then submitting it. I don't think it's possible with today's technology. –  Rudie Nov 15 '11 at 14:28
<!DOCTYPE html>


<html>
    <head>
        <title> HTML 5 </title>
        <script src="js/jquery-1.11.1.js"></script>
        <script src="App.js"></script>
        <style>
          .holder_default {
            width:800px; 
            height:500px; 
            border: 10px dashed #ccc;
          }
          #holder.hover { 
            width:800px; 
            height:500px; 
            border: 10px dashed #0c0 !important; 
          }
          .hidden{
            visibility: hidden;
          }

          .visible{
            visibility: visible;
          }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>

      <form method="post" action="http://example.com/">
        <div id="holder" style="" id="holder" class="holder_default">
          <img src="" id="image_droped" width="800" height="500" style="width:800px; height:500px; border: 10px dashed #7A97FC;" class=" hidden"/>
        </div>

      </form>

    </body>
</html>
//----------App.js---------------------//
$(document).ready(function(){

    var holder = document.getElementById('holder');
    holder.ondragover = function () { this.className = 'hover'; return false; };
    holder.ondrop = function (e) {

      this.className = 'hidden';
      e.preventDefault();
      var file = e.dataTransfer.files[0];
      var reader = new FileReader();
      reader.onload = function (event) {
          document.getElementById('image_droped').className='visible'
          $('#image_droped').attr('src', event.target.result);
        }
      reader.readAsDataURL(file);
    };
  });
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What does it show the user? Can you make a fiddle or online example? –  Rudie Jul 1 at 22:08

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