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In a Windows environment, I don't want two instances of my program running at the same time.

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Is using a Mutex to prevent multiple instances of the same program from running safe?

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If the application runs as a service and you choose CreateEvent or CreateMutex, make sure to create an object in the Global object namespace msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…. –  buzz3791 Oct 22 at 15:33

10 Answers 10

You could check if window class is already registered. Take a look at this MSDN entry.

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-1. From looking at the link and associated links, I don't believe that the handle returned by RegisterClassEx() is a cross-process entity -- even for the "Application Global classes" (CS_GLOBALCLASS set), you must load the DLL that registers the class in every process, according to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms633574(VS.85).aspx. –  j_random_hacker Apr 29 '09 at 3:29

You could create a mutex when the first instance of your application starts. To prevent a second instance all you'd need to do is check if the mutex is being used.

Actually there was a question raised about using mutexes for this purpose here check out JaredPar's answer.

Note: You can use a local mutex if you want the "one instance" to apply only within a user's session (instead of for all users)

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The best way is to use a mutex. See Using Mutex Objects.

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I think you need to consider your scenario a bit before going forward. There are many different interpretations of "running the same program" more than once. For instance do you

  1. Once per machine
  2. Once per logon session
  3. Once per user

All of these have different, albeit similar, solutions.

The easiest one to describe is the per machine. In this case you want to create a named Mutex. One startup every program must obtain this mutex, if they are successful they run and hold onto the Mutex for the duration of the process lifetime. Otherwise some other program is running and they exit immediately.

Unforunately this approach also has its drawbacks. If I want to mess up your program, I can create a mutex with the same name. This will prevent your program from running any instance because they are unable to tell who holds the Mutex, just that something is holding the mutex.

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I was just thinking the same thing... –  RobS Apr 29 '09 at 3:26
2  
Regarding the "hostile mutex", is that really something you need to be concerned about if you're not writing, say, Word? –  Rex M Apr 29 '09 at 3:29
2  
@Rex M, it's really a question the author would have to answer. I would venture a "no" here. But it's something you should consider when writing the program. If nothing else but for the chance you accidentally do it to yourself. –  JaredPar Apr 29 '09 at 3:36

Use a mutex, as others have suggested.

That CreateMutex() documentation from MS has a lot of useful information, and specifically addresses the case of using mutexes for preventing more than one instance of a program from running. In particular:

  • Call CreateMutex() with bInitialOwner = FALSE, then call a wait function (e.g. WaitForSingleObject()) to ensure that just one instance acquires the mutex.
  • Consider using a locked file instead if you're worried about denial of service attacks.
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At the startup of your program, you can enumerate the processes running on your machine

Then if you see that you're already running, quit

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Does it work if the first two instances are started at the same time? –  Liran Orevi Apr 29 '09 at 8:34
2  
There is a race condition here because process enumeration cannot be atomic. This is why a mutex is a good idea. –  RBerteig Apr 29 '09 at 8:40
    
-1. I'm sorry but this is a terrible idea. As well as the race condition mentioned by RBerteig, you have the problem of correctly identifying processes -- if you do this by comparing window titles, you can easily get both false positives (other programs with your window title) and false negatives (if your target program's window title changes -- e.g. many programs show the name of the open document in the window title). A better way exists -- use it instead. –  j_random_hacker Apr 30 '09 at 3:55

this is a class I scripted using boost.interrprocess, I use it to sync between the GUI and CLI versions.

You might find it useful:

#pragma once

#include <boost/interprocess/windows_shared_memory.hpp>
#include <boost/interprocess/mapped_region.hpp>

#ifndef max
#define max(a,b)            (((a) > (b)) ? (a) : (b))
#endif

using boost::interprocess::windows_shared_memory;
using boost::interprocess::mapped_region;
using boost::interprocess::open_or_create;
using boost::interprocess::read_write;
using boost::interprocess::interprocess_exception;

class CProcessMutex
{

public:
    CProcessMutex()
        : m_region()
        , m_status(false)
    {
        initSharedMemory();
        Increment();
    }

    ~CProcessMutex()
    {
        Decrease();
    }

public:
    int GetCount()
    {
        return m_status ? *(static_cast<unsigned char*>(m_region.get_address())) : 0;
    }

private:
    void initSharedMemory()
    {
        try
        {
            //Create a native windows shared memory object.
            windows_shared_memory shm (open_or_create, "shared_memory", read_write, 1);
            //Map the whole shared memory in this process
            m_region.swap(mapped_region(shm, read_write));
            m_status = true;
        }
        catch(interprocess_exception &ex)
        {
            ex.what();
            m_status = false;
        }
    }

    void Increment()
    {
        if(m_status) (*(static_cast<unsigned char*>(m_region.get_address())))++;
    }
    void Decrease()
    {
        if(m_status) (*(static_cast<unsigned char*>(m_region.get_address())))--;
    }
private:
    mapped_region m_region;
    bool m_status;
};

the usage is simple:

CProcessMutex pm;
size_t current_process_count = pm.GetCount();
if(current_process_count > 1)
{
 ...
}

so you can easily limit how many processes in parallel.

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An alternative simple solution is to create a suitably unique global named event (possibly a GUID string) then check for its existence on startup. If it exists then an instance of your app has already been started. If not, you've automatically created the event and can continue to run, e.g.:

// for brevity, a complete set of error handling has been omitted

m_hEvent = CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, szMyUniqueNamedEvent);

switch (GetLastError)
{
    // app is already running
    case ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS:
    {
        CloseHandle(m_hEvent);

        // now exit
        break;
    }

    // this is the first instance of the app
    case ERROR_SUCCESS:
    {
        // global event created and new instance of app is running,
        // continue on, don't forget to clean up m_hEvent on exit
        break;
    }
}
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+1. Any atomic operation that creates a global object if it does not yet exist and returns a value indicating whether this creation occurred will do the job. –  j_random_hacker Apr 30 '09 at 4:01

When you use Qt you can download the QtSingleApplication component.

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If it's your program, then the shortest possible version under windows:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    CreateMutexA(0, FALSE, "Local\\$myprogram$"); // try to create a named mutex
    if(GetLastError() == ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS) // did the mutex already exist?
        return -1; // quit; mutex is released automatically

    // ... program code ...
}

No need to get crazy complex, if all you needed was a simple check...

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Not sure about the "mutex is released automatically" comment. MSDN docs seems to warn about abandoning a mutex, "If a mutex is abandoned, the thread that owned the mutex did not properly release it before terminating. In this case, the status of the shared resource is indeterminate, and continuing to use the mutex can obscure a potentially serious error. Some applications might attempt to restore the resource to a consistent state; this example simply returns an error and stops using the mutex." --msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms686927%28VS.85%29.aspx –  buzz3791 Oct 20 at 17:44
    
@buzz3791 Read the manual again: "Use the CloseHandle function to close the handle. The system closes the handle automatically when the process terminates. The mutex object is destroyed when its last handle has been closed." –  Jorma Rebane Oct 20 at 19:18

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